CSAR Members Staff Booth at Wellness & Safety Fair

CSAR

Earlier today, UCI hosted its annual Wellness and Safety Fair in Aldrich Park. The UCIPD and UCIPD Emergency Services Unit hosted joint booths handing out information and materials to faculty and staff. Campus Search & Rescue (CSAR) members staffed the Emergency Services booth and quizzed event attendees on topics related to emergency supply kits and general preparedness activities in return for emergency glow sticks to add to or begin their kits. These members also shared information about the CSAR program including the purpose, training requirements and time commitments. We hope to see some of you that stopped by the booth enrolled in the next CSAR training series in the fall.

The CSAR program continues to expand here on campus with a training series (#19) currently being offered to campus housing staff on three consecutive Fridays in May. Although part of the larger CSAR members on campus, this group will be specialized to respond to housing-specific incidents.

If you are interested in learning more about the CSAR program please email Anne Widney, Emergency Services Manager, @ awidney@uci.edu

We encourage the community to partner with the UC Irvine Police Department to prevent or report crime by calling (949) 824-5223. If you wish to remain Anonymous, call “OC Crime Stoppers” by dialing 855-TIP-OCCS (855-847-6227), text “OCCS” plus your tip to CRIMES (274637), or use the website http://occrimestoppers.org/

Receive updates directly via email by registering at Nixle.com and search for “UC Irvine Police” or text “UCIrvinePD” to 888777 to receive text message alerts only. Standard text messaging rates may apply depending on your calling plan.

UC Irvine Police Department (949) 824-5223 http://police.uci.edu/ http://facebook.com/UCIrvinePD http://twitter.com/UCIrvinePD http://youtube.com/UCIrvinePD http://nixle.com/University-of-California-Irvine-Police-Department

 

National Police Week: May 10 – 16

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Were you aware that May 10 – 16, 2015 is National Police Week? In 1962, President John F. Kennedy signed a proclamation which designated May 15th as Peace Officers Memorial Day and the week in which that date falls as National Police Week. During this week, we salute those who have made the ultimate sacrifice in the line of duty and honor all of those that have chosen this field of selfless service to their community. We are very fortunate here at UC Irvine to have a cadre of dedicated police officers committed to a community-oriented style of policing that not only responds quickly to the needs of our campus but utilizes and partners with the community in a proactive manner to keep all of us safe.

This week, tens of thousands of law enforcement officers from around the world will converge on Washington, DC to participate in a number of planned events which honor our fallen heroes. Visit the National Police Week website at http://www.policeweek.org/ for more information. In addition to these events, communities and law enforcement agencies across the country will sponsor their own activities to recognize their fallen officers and their families.

In Orange County, Project 999 Riders just completed the annual memorial ride fundraiser (on bicycle) which begins in Sacramento and concludes at the Orange County Sheriff’s Academy in Tustin honoring two local hero’s whose lives were lost this past year. You can read more about this event at http://behindthebadgeoc.com/ under the “more news” section or on Project 999 Riders Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/Project999.

Several other law enforcement agencies in Orange County will hold candlelight vigils and various types of ceremonies to recognize these brave men and women this week. May we all recognize and be grateful for the sacrifices of these individuals as well.

We encourage the community to partner with the UC Irvine Police Department to prevent or report crime by calling (949) 824-5223. If you wish to remain Anonymous, call “OC Crime Stoppers” by dialing 855-TIP-OCCS (855-847-6227), text “OCCS” plus your tip to CRIMES (274637), or use the website http://occrimestoppers.org/

Receive updates directly via email by registering at Nixle.com and search for “UC Irvine Police” or text “UCIrvinePD” to 888777 to receive text message alerts only. Standard text messaging rates may apply depending on your calling plan.

UC Irvine Police Department (949) 824-5223 http://police.uci.edu/ http://facebook.com/UCIrvinePD http://twitter.com/UCIrvinePD http://youtube.com/UCIrvinePD http://nixle.com/University-of-California-Irvine-Police-Department

 

National Wildfire Community Preparedness Day

Wildfire prep day

Last Saturday May 2nd was National Wildfire Community Preparedness Day where residents in communities nationwide embraced and took action on wildfire preparedness. Sponsored by the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), this event initiated hundreds of activities that brought neighbors together and encouraged collaborative efforts to protect and increase the resiliency of communities; particularly those in fire prone regions. Activities included preparedness measures from future wildfire risk as well as recovery efforts from current post-fire impacts. More information can be found on this nationwide effort at http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/outdoors/wildland-fires/national-wildfire-community-preparedness-day

Additionally, President Obama released a statement supporting these community efforts and recognizing the need for preventative/protective measures against this threat that annually plagues so many during the summer months. See more at http://www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach/nwcpd_message.html

To stay informed on wildfire prevention, protection and mitigation efforts here in Orange County follow the Orange County Fire Authority (OCFA) on facebook at https://www.facebook.com/OrangeCountyFire

We encourage the community to partner with the UC Irvine Police Department to prevent or report crime by calling (949) 824-5223. If you wish to remain Anonymous, call “OC Crime Stoppers” by dialing 855-TIP-OCCS (855-847-6227), text “OCCS” plus your tip to CRIMES (274637), or use the website http://occrimestoppers.org/

Receive updates directly via email by registering at Nixle.com and search for “UC Irvine Police” or text “UCIrvinePD” to 888777 to receive text message alerts only. Standard text messaging rates may apply depending on your calling plan.

UC Irvine Police Department (949) 824-5223 http://police.uci.edu/ http://facebook.com/UCIrvinePD http://twitter.com/UCIrvinePD http://youtube.com/UCIrvinePD http://nixle.com/University-of-California-Irvine-Police-Department

 

Get Ready; Stay Ready Campaign 2015

May – First Aid Kit

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The “Get Ready; Stay Ready” campaign focus for the month of May is on developing/replenishing first aid kits. Having a sufficient first aid kit is similar to stockpiling food and water in that it is an all-hazards preparedness practice. All emergencies pose a potential risk of injury or illness and, therefore, it is critical that we have a kit with the necessary supplies to respond.

If you don’t already have a first aid kit there are several options you may consider. The first is to shop for an all-inclusive kit that is ready for use upon purchase. There are pros and cons to this option. On the one hand, it will probably save you time and energy but can be a little more expensive if you are working within a budget. If you do purchase one of these kits be sure to spend some time going through it to identify anything else that can be added in order to meet your personal needs. Nexus, our online UC Disaster Supply Store, is an excellent resource if you are considering this option. You can shop their online store at: http://www.nexisprep.com/universityofcalifornia

Another option is to build the kit yourself and shop for contents individually. This option presents the potential for cost savings as many of these items you can buy in the form of a generic brand and can be found at the 99 Cents Store or something comparable. You will also probably gain more familiarity with your first aid supplies by building it item-by-item and have a better understanding of its capabilities.

Whether you purchase an all-inclusive kit or build it from scratch we encourage you to reference the list of recommended first aid supplies below and align your kit accordingly. Remember, there may be some personal unique additions to these general supplies that you may have to augment in order to ensure that the needs of all family members are met.  Visit Ready OC for more information on disaster preparedness at http://www.readyoc.org/

Adhesive bandages (various sizes), 5” x 9” sterile dressing, conforming roller gauze bandage, triangular bandages (sling), 2” sterile gauze pads, 4” sterile gauze pads, Roll 3” cohesive bandage, germicidal hand wipes or waterless alcohol-based hand sanitizer or moist diaper wipes, antiseptic wipes, pairs large-medical grade-non-latex gloves, tongue depressor blades, adhesive tape, 2” width, antibacterial ointment, cold pack, scissors (small, personal), tweezers, assorted sizes of safety pins, cotton balls, thermometer, tube of petroleum jelly or other lubricant, sunscreen, CPR breathing barrier, such as a face shield, antibiotic creams and ointments, rubbing alcohol, hydrogen peroxide and first aid manual.

We encourage the community to partner with the UC Irvine Police Department to prevent or report crime by calling (949) 824-5223. If you wish to remain Anonymous, call “OC Crime Stoppers” by dialing 855-TIP-OCCS (855-847-6227), text “OCCS” plus your tip to CRIMES (274637), or use the website http://occrimestoppers.org/

Receive updates directly via email by registering at Nixle.com and search for “UC Irvine Police” or text “UCIrvinePD” to 888777 to receive text message alerts only. Standard text messaging rates may apply depending on your calling plan.

UC Irvine Police Department (949) 824-5223 http://police.uci.edu/ http://facebook.com/UCIrvinePD http://twitter.com/UCIrvinePD http://youtube.com/UCIrvinePD http://nixle.com/University-of-California-Irvine-Police-Department

 

Earthquake Preparedness Month

Earthquake Month

The seismic risks that haunt us here in southern California are enough to dictate that every month be dedicated to earthquake preparedness our personal calendars. However, on a national calendar, the month of April has been assigned to this risk with, of course, the annual earthquake shakeout taking place six months later in October. It’s important to remember that earthquake preparedness is not merely just about stockpiling water and granola bars. That’s absolutely part of it, however, it is also about understanding risks, knowing how to react, having a plan for communicating with your loved ones and much more.

Earlier this week, KUCI’s “Ask A Leader” talk show featured a segment with UCI’s Emergency Services Manager, Anne Widney, to discuss Earthquake Preparedness Month. Some of the relevant subtopics included what to do/not to do during an earthquake, how people can prepare their homes, cars and workplace for disasters, the structural integrity of buildings on campus pertaining to seismic activity, programs/teams established to respond to campus emergencies and other special considerations. To listen to this podcast interview please visit: http://askaleader.com/?p=464

For more information on earthquake safety and preparedness tips please visit the following link which can also be found on the UCI Police Department website: http://www.police.uci.edu/em/EarthquakeSafetyTop10.pdf April is a great month to Have A Kit, Make A Plan, Be Informed & Get Involved.

 

April Is Distracted Driving Awareness Month

Driving Talking

As part of April’s Distracted Driving Awareness Month campaign, there are a number of Orange County jurisdictions that will be joining over 200 other local law enforcement agencies and the California Highway Patrol to increase education and enforcement efforts. Some of these jurisdictions include Anaheim, Santa Ana, Los Alamitos and Newport Beach.

“Driving takes one’s full attention and any distraction can have deadly, dangerous consequences,” said Chief Jay R. Johnson. “Imagine driving for four or five seconds while blindfolded… that can be the effect of looking down to send a text message.  In the average time it takes to check a text message – less than 5 seconds – a car travelling at 60 mph will travel more than the length of a football field.”

Throughout the month of April, law enforcement will focus on educating the public about the dangers of distracted driving.  April 1 and April 15 have also been earmarked for special statewide high-visibility enforcement days for all law enforcement agencies that are participating in the national traffic safety campaign.

When you hear the notification alert on your cell phone, the urge to read and answer an incoming message can be almost overwhelming. The Office of Traffic Safety is using a message of “Silence the Distraction” in new public service announcements aimed at getting drivers to turn off their phones while driving so they will not be tempted.

“No text, call, or social media update is worth a crash,” said OTS Director Rhonda Craft.  “With an average of less than a second to react to an urgent situation, drivers need to have all their attention on the roadway.”

“Each of us must drive responsibly, keeping full attention to the task at hand: DRIVING,” Chief Johnson added.  “The collective goal with this month-long campaign is to change the behavior of all drivers.  That change begins with education.”

The increased enforcement and education aims to persuade drivers to recognize the dangers of distracted driving and reduce the number of people impacted by this perilous behavior.  The “It’s Not Worth It!” theme emphasizes that a phone call or text is not worth a hefty fine or a collision. The current minimum ticket cost in California is $161, with subsequent tickets costing at least $281.

To avoid a distracted driving ticket or crash, the Newport Beach Police Department offers drivers the following tips:

  • Turn off your phone and/or put it out of reach while driving.
  • In your outgoing message, note that you cannot answer the phone while you are driving.
  • Do not call or text anyone at a time when you think they may be driving.

The UCI Police Department supports this campaign and would like to remind our community that distracted driving while on campus presents even some elevated risks than perhaps other places. We have a significantly large number of pedestrians, skateboarders and bicyclists on campus and, therefore, drivers should pay extra close attention while commuting around the university. Likewise, if you are on foot, skateboard, bicycle or another transportation device you should remain aware of your surroundings; particularly while crossing streets, waiting at intersections or walking through parking lots/parking garages. Silencing the distractions will help keep the entire community a safer place.

We encourage the community to partner with the UC Irvine Police Department to prevent or report crime by calling (949) 824-5223. If you wish to remain Anonymous, call “OC Crime Stoppers” by dialing 855-TIP-OCCS (855-847-6227), text “OCCS” plus your tip to CRIMES (274637), or use the website http://occrimestoppers.org/

Receive updates directly via email by registering at Nixle.com and search for “UC Irvine Police” or text “UCIrvinePD” to 888777 to receive text message alerts only. Standard text messaging rates may apply depending on your calling plan.

UC Irvine Police Department (949) 824-5223 http://police.uci.edu/ http://facebook.com/UCIrvinePD http://twitter.com/UCIrvinePD http://youtube.com/UCIrvinePD http://nixle.com/University-of-California-Irvine-Police-Department

 

Get Ready; Stay Ready Campaign 2015

April – Evacuation Plan

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The “Get Ready; Stay Ready” campaign focus for the month of April is on developing/improving evacuation plans. Evacuation planning for hotels, government buildings, commercial space and other official places of business is required by law. However, evacuation planning for the household is a highly encouraged, yet frequently overlooked, practice for all responsible heads of household. The development and annual review of a household evacuation plan is critical not only for large-scale disaster preparedness but smaller; structure-specific emergencies as well such as fires, release of hazardous materials and other dangers within the home.

When creating an evacuation for your home it is important to remember the following:

  • Identify two escape routes for each room. Ensure that these routes remain clear.
  • Test all windows & doors to ensure that they open.
  • Identify the location of any throw ladder, or other special equipment.
  • Identify the location of fire extinguishers, smoke detectors, first aid kits & 72 hour disaster kit.
  • Identify the locations of the shutoffs for gas, water & electricity.
  • Draw your floor plan, then draw your evacuation routes & two separate meeting locations outside of the home. Meeting locations should be far enough away from all anticipated hazards.
  • If you live in a two-story home, make one drawing for each story.
  • Identify outside hazards (Fences, trees, power lines, etc.)
  • Practice evacuation drills 2x per year with the time change (Spring & Fall) & involve all members of the household in drills.

The process of developing a household evacuation plan can be simple as getting a pen, paper and 1 hour of your loved ones time/attention. Now obviously, the more time and thought you can invest in properly identifying the resources, hazards, special considerations etc. on your plan the better, but at the same time don’t overthink it. The key concept is “get everybody out and do it safely.” Keeping this theme in mind coupled with the recommendations above, you should have no problem developing an effective evacuation plan and increasing the safety of all household members.

Visit ReadyOC http://www.readyoc.org/prepare/plan.html or Ready.gov for more information http://www.ready.gov/emergency-planning-checklists

Also, we highly encourage all members of the UCI community to know and practice the evacuation routes of the buildings that you frequently visit as well as the assembly areas for those buildings (see http://www.ehs.uci.edu/em/zonemap.html). Likewise, if you are one of the thousands of students living on campus we highly encourage you to reference the emergency evacuation plan posted in your residence hall/apartment complex or speak with your resident advisor/apartment management for more information.

We encourage the community to partner with the UC Irvine Police Department to prevent or report crime by calling (949) 824-5223. If you wish to remain Anonymous, call “OC Crime Stoppers” by dialing 855-TIP-OCCS (855-847-6227), text “OCCS” plus your tip to CRIMES (274637), or use the website http://occrimestoppers.org/

Receive updates directly via email by registering at Nixle.com and search for “UC Irvine Police” or text “UCIrvinePD” to 888777 to receive text message alerts only. Standard text messaging rates may apply depending on your calling plan.

UC Irvine Police Department

(949) 824-5223

http://police.uci.edu/ http://facebook.com/UCIrvinePD http://twitter.com/UCIrvinePD http://youtube.com/UCIrvinePD http://nixle.com/University-of-California-Irvine-Police-Department

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Tsunami Preparedness Week: March 22 – 28, 2015

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Tsunamis are among Earth’s rarest hazards. But, even though tsunamis do not occur very often, and most are small and nondestructive, they pose a major threat to coastal communities, particularly in the Pacific. A tsunami can strike any ocean coast at any time. There is no season for tsunamis. We cannot predict where, when or how destructive the next tsunami will be. However, while tsunamis cannot be prevented, there are things you can do before, during and after a tsunami that could save your life and the lives of your family and friends. The National Weather Service provides some excellent educational material on tsunamis and what you can do to keep yourself and your loved ones safe in the event of a tsunami. Visit them at http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/Tsunami/

We have a lot of coastline here in Orange County and not that far from our UC Irvine community. So, in the event that our coast was struck by a fairly significant tsunami we would, without a doubt, be impacted here on campus. Many of our community members live or have family/friends who reside in Newport Beach and neighboring jurisdictions. The rest of us probably visit one of these coastal communities from time to time so it is extremely important to heed the warning and immediately move inland or to high ground following an earthquake. Every coastal city in Orange County is “Tsunami Ready,” as designated by NOAA/NWS (http://www.tsunamiready.noaa.gov/) which is why you will see the Tsunami Hazard Zone signs near the beaches (image attached). Do not take this instruction lightly. Tsunamis travel quickly and gain strength with each set of waves so it is no exaggeration to state that “every second counts.”

There have been hundreds of videos uploaded to YouTube with raw footage from the 2004 Sri Lankan Tsunami as well as the 2011 Tsunami that struck Japan after their devastating 9.0 earthquake. While these clips are sad to view, they provide us with a better understanding of the sheer magnitude and force carried by these types of disasters.

 

Campus Responds Effectively to “Formidable Flood” Exercise

Shelter Ex2 March 2015

UC Irvine emergency management stakeholders convened in multiple capacities earlier this week to conduct annual exercising of emergency operation plans. Two exercises were conducted back-to-back on Monday and Tuesday in which participants responded to a common scenario dubbed the “Formidable Flood.” This scenario, which mirrored the impact of the ‘real world’ water main break at UCLA last year, prompted the UCI campus Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and several Department Operations Centers (DOC’s – Housing, Facilities Management & EH&S) to activate on Monday in an effort to exercise how such a coordinated response would occur. Then, on the following day, the UCI Care & Shelter Team (CAST) engaged in part II of this exercise scenario by opening, operating & closing a mock shelter at the Anteater Recreational Center (ARC) for those campus residents fictitiously displaced by the flood.

The two exercises rendered positive feedback from both participants and evaluators and there were some excellent observations voiced in the “hotwash” (after-exercise review) which followed both exercises. One of the common observational themes from the EOC/DOC exercise was “practice makes perfect and we get better with each exercise.” Participants agreed that the more opportunities they have to work within these EOC roles and collaborate with their cross-disciplinary counterparts in the EOC the more confident and effective they become. As with any good “hotwash,” the Emergency Services Unit took away some good documentation for improvement planning as well.

The consensus from the Care & Shelter Team was that “hands-on application of classroom training is invaluable.” This was the first exercise specifically designed to test the skills of the Care & Shelter Team since the group’s inception last year. All participants provided insightful feedback from their perspective on ways in which the team can improve moving forward as well as ways that future exercise design processes can be enhanced. The UCIPD would like to extend its gratitude, on behalf of the campus community, to all EOC/DOC participants and CAST members that participated in these exercises making UCI a more resilient campus. Additionally, this exercise could not have been such a success without the help of our campus CSAR & Zone Crew members, UCIPD volunteers and the American Red Cross. A warm recognition goes out to all of these individuals as well.

Shelter Ex-March 2015

 

Weather Safety Spring

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Aside from last week’s headline hailstorm, when was the last time you saw a SoCal beach look like this? The National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recently kicked off a “Weather Safety Spring” campaign across America and SoCal is no exception. Between the snowy shores of last Monday followed by the 80 degree temperatures that followed a few days later, we can’t be sure what to expect next. As stated by NOAA, “spring is three months of danger that can imperil the unprepared. It roars in like a lion and continues to roar across the United States throughout March, April and May.”

For the next 3 months various regions of the country will take specific preparedness measures that pertain to their greatest weather-related projected events. Residents on the east coast will continue shoveling their driveways and hope that they have seen the worst of this record-breaking winter. The Midwest will prepare for their inevitable seasonal tornadoes and here in SoCal we should be looking at all of the weather-related risks that pose a threat to this region of the country. What’s scary, however, is that although we by-and-large enjoy our year-round weather here we have experienced and are at risk for every common Springtime hazard cited by NOAA including tornadoes, floods, thunderstorm winds, hail, lightning, heat, wildfires, rip currents and tsunamis. Please visit the following website for helpful preparedness tips on these weather-related hazards and for more information on NOAA’s “Weather Safety Spring” campaign:

http://www.nws.noaa.gov/com/weatherreadynation/spring_safety.html#.VQDKFZ3n-ie

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Even if you are not particularly worried about tornados in southern California you may have friends or relatives in the Midwest that you can remind about these seasonal risks. If so, talk to them about it. Be an agent for awareness and share your knowledge with others. You may be surprised just how little your friends or family members understand about personal preparedness. Maybe you travel to different parts of the country that do experience these hazards. Do you make this a regular piece of your trip planning? If not, it should be on your checklist along with the packing, airfare ticket, rental car reservation and hotel accommodations.

Lastly, with the time change occurring over the weekend it is that time of year again. If you haven’t already done so, test your smoke alarms and change out the batteries if necessary. Be sure to go through your disaster supplies as well, discard all expired items and replenish as necessary.