October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month!

Learn to protect yourself and UC during National Cyber Security Awareness Month

You’ve read the headlines. Organizations big and small, including even large retailers and mega companies, are not immune to data breaches and hackers’ increasingly sophisticated schemes. It seems daunting and you may ask yourself, “What can I do?”

You can protect yourself — and the university — from becoming victims by staying vigilant.

October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM) and a good time to remind ourselves that the information and systems we use to carry out UC’s mission of teaching, research, and public service must be safeguarded. Technological protections alone are not always enough. Keeping that information secure is a shared responsibility, and everyone at UC has an opportunity to protect it.

Cybersecurity resources:
– UCI’s National Cyber Security Awareness Month page http://security.uci.edu/cyber-security/index-ncsam.html
– UCI’s Information Security and Privacy website https://security.uci.edu/
– UC’s systemwide Information Security Awareness website https://security.ucop.edu/resources/security-awareness/index.html

Ask questions or get help by contacting the OIT Help Desk:
– Online at OIT’s website
– By email at oit@uci.edu
– By phone at 949-824-2222

National Preparedness Month, Week 3: “Practice & Build Out Your Plans”

National Preparedness Month has been observed in September since 2004 and has already reached its 13-year anniversary. The objective of this declared observance is to encourage Americans to take steps to prepare for emergencies in their homes, businesses, schools, and communities. Some of these steps include building emergency supply kits, making a family emergency plan and communications plan, staying informed on disaster information and related risks, and taking advantage of opportunities to get involved in preparedness/response efforts. There are a number of exciting things going on in the preparedness community this month which can be found at https://www.ready.gov/september

The focus of National Preparedness Month Week 3 is on practicing and further development of your emergency plans. Hopefully, you have done or will do your homework on gathering information about the hazards and/or potential disasters that could harm you or your family members. Perhaps you’ve taken that crucial step in disaster preparedness by building your emergency kit or “go bag.” And if you’ve really taken your preparedness seriously then you have probably developed an emergency plan for yourself and/or your family (see http://www.ready.gov/make-a-plan). But now what? One of the most important things you can do to validate your preparedness efforts is to practice them. So what does this mean exactly? How might you practice them and what elements should you focus on? Consider the following and get creative with it:

Exercise your emergency plan with your family

a. Identified evacuation routes (travel)
i. Practice evacuating to the destinations you have identified by taking the routes you have identified in your plan.
ii. Time how long it takes.
iii. Understand traffic/road construction patterns at different times of day.
iv. Think about possible vulnerabilities of these routes and how they may be impassable (under/over bridges, overpasses, etc.) following a large disaster; in particular, for us southern Californians, a large earthquake.
v. Drive alternate routes to arrive at the same destination.
vi. Ensure that am radio stations are preset in your car to those stations that will provide local disaster information; particularly regarding evacuation routes.

b. Identified evacuation routes (in home)
i. Practice the evacuation routes with the family to get outside the home.
ii. Make sure that nothing is obstructing these routes and that doors, windows, garage doors, etc. all open and function correctly.
iii. Test everybody’s knowledge of where the primary and backup meeting locations are outside the home and validate that they are still in safe; open places.
iv. Ensure that everybody has close-toed shoes accessible next to or near their bed to avoid walking over sharp objects.
v. Time how long it takes for the family to evacuate and did they grab the things identified in the emergency plan (i.e. “go bag,” pets, etc.)

c. Written emergency communications plan
i. Make sure everybody in the family has the contact information for the out-of-area point-of-contact to check-in with following a disaster. Likewise ensure the out-of-area point-of-contact has the contact information for those family members that will be calling. Validate all contact information is up-to-date.
ii. Call this out-of-area contact person and remind them that they are the primary point-of-contact identified in the communications plan. Also, consider identifying a back-up and tertiary. Make sure that you have a conversation with these back up contacts about this plan.
iii. Ensure that everybody knows what information to provide this person following a disaster (i.e. condition, location, needs, reunification status, etc.)
iv. Everybody send each other a “TEST Emergency” text message.

Check your emergency kit or “go bag”:

a. Pull everything out of you emergency kit and refresh yourself on what’s inside. Many people buy kits pre-packaged which is great but not everybody takes the time to go through it to see what’s inside and understand how everything works.
b. Make sure others in your home know what’s on the inside and when these supplies might be used.
c. Check the functionality of these supplies and replace/replenish batteries and anything else that need to be occasionally switched out or that may expire.
d. Identify any other items that should be added to your kit and fill some of these gaps. The idea is to continuously improve your kit or “go bag” over time.
e. Put your backpack on your back and wear it or hold it for a little while and get a feel for how heavy it is. Ask yourself whether or not you would be able to carry it for very long.

Testing and exercising the above aspects of your plan and supplies are important but can be made fun at the same time. You may choose to use a disaster scenario of your choice, activate your family’s practice run of this plan without any notice to them, or treat them to ice cream after your family has successfully “survived the zombie apocalypse.” It’s ok to add some humor to it and, in fact, this is one way in which many people learn and retain information the best. It is especially recommended to make these “dry runs” fun if you have small children in the house because this will get them used to and conditioned to some of the actions to be taken in a real emergency.

Disasters don’t plan ahead, you can!

Enjoy the Eclipse, Protect Your Eyes

We are now within a week of one of the most anticipated celestial events in recent history, however, before running out of the classroom, workplace, or your home to observe next week’s solar eclipse there is some precautionary information you should know. The Orange County Register published an article yesterday which answered some commonly asked questions related to eye protection during a solar eclipse.  The questions and answers are summarized below but to access the complete article please visit: http://www.ocregister.com/2017/08/15/how-to-protect-your-eyes-during-next-weeks-solar-eclipse-in-southern-california/

How can I safely view the partial (for southern Californian’s) eclipse?

Wear eclipse glasses or watch with a handheld solar viewer or through a pinhole projection. Eclipse glasses must meet the worldwide standard known as ISO 12312-2.  Recommended vendors can be found here: https://eclipse.aas.org/resources/solar-filters

Why aren’t dark sun glasses good enough?

Regular sunglasses, at most, absorb 90% of sunlight while eclipse glasses are designed to absorb 99.9%.

What happens if I look directly at a partial eclipse?

Damage can occur in seconds, not minutes. The retina is a delicate structure in the back of the eye that can be permanently scarred by the intensity of the sun.

What has research shown about eye injuries after an eclipse?

Injuries are most common in children or young adults. In particular, teenagers and young adults that still bear the natural developmental trait of “invincibility” tend to incur injuries as a result of believing they cannot be harmed by staring at the sun.

While wearing eclipse glasses, is it safe to take pictures or use binoculars?

No, the intense solar rays coming through the devices will damage the solar filter and your eyes.

Is it safe to watch from the car or indoors?

No, tinted glass does not provide adequate protection.

Are some people at greater risk than others?

Yes, those with lighter eye color or underlying eye disease are more susceptible to damage.

For more information about the solar eclipse on August 21st and safety-related measures please visit the NASA website at https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/eclipse-who-what-where-when-and-how  Stay safe and enjoy!

 

UCI Emergency Management Hosts FEMA Training

Last week, the UCI Emergency Management Division hosted a two-day; 16-hour FEMA training titled “Executive Seminar: Prevention of, Response to, and Recovery from Campus Emergencies.” The curriculum provided participants with an understanding of and ability to navigate through the difficult aspects of dealing with campus emergencies involving natural or human-caused events, including acts of violence.  The course consisted of small; problem-based, integrated group activities that required a coordinated approach to solve.  Through tabletop scenarios, course participants observed developing incidents and responded in a manner that was consistent with currently established campus plans, policies and procedures.

The training was made possible through FEMA’s National Domestic Preparedness Consortium (NDPC) and this course, specifically, was delivered by three subject matter experts from Louisiana State University’s (LSU) National Center for Biomedical Research and Training (NCBRT). The course was well attended and included both UCI staff as well as public safety personnel from other local colleges and universities which contributed greatly to the quality of class discussions.  A few of these other institutions included CSU Dominguez Hills, Loyola Marymount, Coastline Community College, UC San Diego and Los Angeles Community College District.

The training provided UCI emergency management with new “tools” and operational concepts to consider regarding campus preparedness, however, it also validated what a strong emergency management program the campus currently has in place. In fact, during the lead instructor’s final remarks, he commented that having delivered this course to more than 120 colleges and universities during his tenure, UCI has one of the strongest and most robust emergency management programs that he has ever seen.  Furthermore, he requested permission to use the UCI Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and related Annexes in future courses as “best practices” to benefit other institutes of higher education.

UCI strives to be a leader in education, research, patient care, innovation and world change and the Emergency Management Division has adopted this same vision as it relates to being a leader in emergency preparedness both within higher education and the larger community as a whole.

 

National Immunization Awareness Month 2017

As summer begins to wind down, children will be headed back to school or beginning school for their first time. This can be a busy time for parents as they start shopping for backpacks, binders, pens/pencils, clothes, shoes and a number of other items that will help their children have a great start to the school year.  But let’s not forget the most important item on our back-to-school checklist: immunizations.  This action, above all, will help ensure your child has a healthy and successful year.

The month of August is National Immunization Awareness Month which is sponsored by the CDC and coordinated by the National Public Health Information Coalition (NPHIC). This initiative not only focuses on children going back-to-school but provides an opportunity to highlight the value of immunization across the lifespan.  Activities focus on encouraging all people to protect their health by being vaccinated against infectious diseases.

Visit the NPHIC https://www.nphic.org/niam or CDC https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/events/niam.html for more information regarding immunization recommendations for pregnant women, infants/young children, school-age children, pre-teen/teen & adults.  Also, for UCI students, please visit the Student Health Center http://www.shs.uci.edu/ for additional questions/consultation regarding immunizations.

 

Facebook’s Emerging Role in Emergency Management

At the tail end of last year (December 2016), UCIPD posted an article about Facebook’s “Safety Check” feature which has become an emerging means to communicate one’s personal safety with loved ones in the immediate aftermath of a disaster or emergency. Now, the company has agreed to take its role in emergency management one step further by using data to help communities rebuild and recover following disasters.

On June 7th, Facebook introduced a disaster mapping tool that uses “aggregated, de-identified Facebook data” to help organizations address the critical gap in information they often face when responding to natural disasters. The company worked with several disaster response and relief organizations to identify what data would be most helpful and how it could be utilized to address the needs of populations immediately after a disaster.  There are three primary types of maps that will be used to display the compiled data including Location Density Maps, Movement Maps and Safety Check Maps.  For more information please see the company’s press release at the following link: https://newsroom.fb.com/news/2017/06/using-data-to-help-communities-recover-and-rebuild/

 

UCI Receives “Spotlight on Collaboration” Award at 2017 Risk Summit

In June of 2015, the Campus Continuity Subcommittee was convened to carry out an 18-month campus wide initiative of conducting the university’s first Business Impact Analysis (BIA) and developing the framework for the enterprise continuity & recovery plan. The subcommittee was made up of quasi-level executive membership representing the following departments: Police/Emergency Management, Campus Counsel, Risk Services, Human Resources, Administrative & Business Services Office, Office of Information Technology (OIT)/Disaster Recovery, School Information Technology, Office of Research, Academic Affairs & Student Affairs.

The Campus Continuity Subcommittee met on a quarterly basis for 18 months (June 2015 – November 2016) to review and prioritize the risk values associated with 527 essential functions performed by 84 departments across campus in order to identify which of these would have the greatest impact on the campus mission should they cease for any period of time. The methodology behind the risk value-rating process targeted five separate areas of impact including research, teaching, operations, finance and compliance.  The subcommittee served as a quality control panel for this process; viewing it through their own respective area of expertise, in order to ensure that the data collected, processed and interpreted throughout the course of 104 department-level interviews was considering “risk” through a variety of different lenses.

A BIG thanks and congratulations to the UCI Campus Continuity Subcommittee!

 

June is Pet Preparedness Month

Have you thought about your pets when creating your disaster plan and your emergency kit?  Make sure your animals stay safe and remain a loving part of your family by taking the steps below:

  • Get a Rescue Alert Sticker – The Rescue Alert Sticker will notify people that pets are inside your home.  Place sticker in a visible spot for a rescue worker to see.       Include the types and number of pets in the home, the name of your veterinarian and your veterinarian’s phone number.  If you have evacuated, write “EVACUATED” across the sticker. https://secure.aspca.org/take-action/order-your-pet-safety-pack
  • Find a Place for your Pet – Never evacuate without your pets.  Make sure you have a predetermined place you and your pets can go in the case of an evacuation because not all shelter or other designated places of refuge will allow pets.
  • Pet Emergency Kit – Along with an emergency preparedness kit for your household, it is also a good idea to create one for your pets. Some items to include are: a pet first-aid kit, enough food and water to last 3-7 days and toys to keep your pet occupied.

For more pet preparedness tips, the following are terrific resources:

http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/disaster-preparedness/

https://www.ready.gov/animals

http://www.readyoc.org/prepare/pets.html

UCI Emergency Management Delivers a “Best Practice” at Conference

Last week, the UCI Emergency Management team had a visible presence at the 5th Annual Best Practices in Higher Education Emergency Management Conference hosted by Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, VA. The presentation, which was delivered to emergency management and business continuity practitioners at various institutions nationwide, focused on the strategy, methodology and results of the UCI campus wide Business Impact Analysis (BIA) that was completed in November of last year. The purpose of this 18-month initiative was to effectively identify the institution’s mission essential functions, project anticipated impacts of downtime, and determine campus priorities based upon risk values in order to inform the Campus Continuity Framework.  The completed BIA and campus continuity framework now serve as the University’s foundation for all business continuity efforts moving forward.

The BIA highlights the true nature of collaborative partnerships here on campus as this project required a multi-disciplinary subcommittee to convene in May of 2015 and meet quarterly until its completion. This dynamic group included representation from the following: A&BS Office of the Vice Chancellor, Risk Management, Campus Counsel, Office of Research Operations, Student Affairs, Academic Affairs, OIT, School IT and UCI Police Department Emergency Management Division.  The contributions made by the subcommittee were extremely valuable as each member viewed the risk evaluation process through their own unique “lens of expertise” which, fundamentally, validated the results.

Business continuity planning in higher education is critical to building a resilient institution and the approach and methodology used by UCI to conduct a thorough; campus wide BIA to establish the foundation of all continuity planning efforts moving forward is gaining recognition as a best practice. UCI strives to be a leader in education, research, patient care, innovation and world change and the Emergency Management Division has adopted this same vision as it relates to being a leader in emergency preparedness both within higher education and the larger community as a whole.

 

National EMS Week: May 21 – 27, 2017

In 1973, President Gerald Ford authorized EMS Week to celebrate EMS practitioners and the important work they do in our nation’s communities. Back then, EMS was a new profession, and EMS practitioners had only just started to be recognized as a critical component of emergency medicine and the public health safety net.

A lot has changed since then. EMS is now firmly established as an essential public function and a vital component of the medical care continuum. On any given day, EMS practitioners help save lives by responding to medical emergencies, including heart attack, difficulty breathing, a fall or accident, drowning, cardiac arrest, stroke, drug overdose or acute illness. EMS may provide both basic and advanced medical care at the scene of an emergency and en route to a hospital. EMS practitioners care for their patients’ medical needs and show caring and compassion to their patients in their most difficult moments.

So, next week, or any week for that matter, when you’re in the grocery store and you see an EMS practitioner in uniform thank them for their vital public service they provide to our communities every day. For more information about National EMS Week visit https://www.naemt.org/ems_agencies_audience/ems-week/celebrate-ems-week