2018 Organizing Committee

Viviane Mahieux

Assistant Professor of Spanish, Spanish and Portuguese
School of Humanities

My research interests include the Latin American and European avant-gardes, the city and urban theory, the genre of the chronicle in the 19th and 20th centuries, journalism and media theory. My book, Urban Chroniclers in Modern Latin America: The Shared Intimacy of Everyday Life is forthcoming in December 2011 by the University of Texas Press. In 2009, I published a collection of the chronicles of Cube Bonifant, a Mexican woman journalist who began publishing in the 1920’s, entitled Una pequeña marquesa de Sade: Crónicas selectas 1921-1948. My articles have appeared in Hispanic Review, Revista de Crítica Literaria Latinoamericana and Revista de Estudios Hispánicos. I am now beginning research on the particular relationship between print journalism and the avant-gardes in post-revolutionary Mexico.

Jacobo Sefami

Professor, Spanish and Portuguese
School of Humanities

My field of specialization is Modern and Contemporary Latin American poetry —a vast, diverse and expanding area of research. I have done work mainly on two generations: (1) poets associated with the Surrealist movement in Latin America (which produced its first works in the 1940’s and 50’s), such as Gonzalo Rojas, Olga Orozco, Enrique Molina, and Alvaro Mutis; and (2) a radical group of Latin American poets of the 1970’s, 80’s, and 90’s that is characterized by its experimentation with language. This latter group has been identified through the poetics of the Neo-Baroque. I am currently working on a book of criticism that deals with theoretical issues (migration, alterity, allegory, etc.) associated with contemporary poetry (some of the poets included are José Kozer, Coral Bracho, Raúl Zurita, David Huerta, Alejandra Pizarnik, Myriam Moscona, Carmen Boullosa, and Gloria Gervitz).

Araceli Calderón

PhD Candidate, Spanish and Portuguese
School of Humanities

My dissertation “Motherhood in Movement: Artistic Depictions the Mexican Revolution” is an interdisciplinary project that investigates the representation of various ideologies of motherhood in artistic depictions of the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920). Within nationalist ideology motherhood has a symbolic, practical, and psychosocial potency. I pose that motherhood in movement is the intersectionality of changing signifiers of motherhood, the spaces it occupied, and its constant fluidity. In order to survive political and geographical hardships, maternal practices were negotiated against the hegemonic rhetoric of motherhood. By analyzing multiple and even contradictory depictions of motherhood that are in tension with the hegemonic rhetoric, I hope contribute to a deeper understanding of maternity—national, transnational, and generational—during the Mexican Revolution.

Karem Lissette Delgado Andrade

PhD Student, Spanish and Portuguese
School of Humanities

I received my B.A. from UCLA and my M.A. from UC Riverside. My research interest is focused on Judeo-Spanish and Latin American literature. One of my interests are the hybridity and liminality of this minority literature, especially the foreshadow of the post-modern subject. I am currently working on the writings of judeo-converts and, specifically, inquisitorial processes of the XV, XVI and XVII centuries.

Gilberto Núñez

PhD Student, Spanish and Portuguese
School of Humanities

Originally from Sinaloa, Mexico, I am currently in my third year as a Ph.D. student in the Spanish and Portuguese Department at the University of California, Irvine. I completed a Master’s degree and a Bachelor’s degree in Spanish Literature at California State University, Fresno. My academic interests include masculinity from the 20th century to the present in Mexico and Colombia; Narcoliterature with a particular focus on the novel of sicariato.

Alejandra Castellanos

PhD Student, Spanish and Portuguese
School of Humanities

I obtained my B.A. in Spanish, an English-Spanish translating certificate,  and a minor in Chicano Studies from Cal State University, Channel Islands. At UC Irvine, I am a second year Ph.D. student in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese. My  research interest is the deconstruction of the narrative of masculinity  in contemporary Latin American literature. In addition, I would like to hold literary workshops for immigrants with a focus on the exchange of ideas and experiences of masculinities.