New on the shelves – May 2017

cover image Our list of new books is updated. Last month, the Law Library received titles on employment law, legal writing, legal history, and international law, among other topics.

One of our new titles is Federal Civil Procedure Before Trial, edited by James M. Wagstaffe and published by LexisNexis. That name might sound vaguely familiar because Mr. Wagstaffe used to write and edit a Rutter guide covering the same topic. Now his treatment is available in print in mostly-white binders with jaunty pops of red and black, a somewhat daring color combination for a legal title.

This new three-volume set is shelved upstairs in the Reading Room at KF 8900 .W35.

Our collection supports the scholarly and clinical work of faculty and students. Let us know if you have a suggestion for a new book.

New on the shelves – April 2017

Our list of new books is updated. Last month, the Law Library received a wide variety of materials, covering everything from abortion to the WTO.

One of our new titles is The Unexpected Scalia : A Conservative Justice’s Liberal Opinions, by David Dorsen. In his Q&A at SCOTUSblog1, Dorsen says

Although I broadly disagreed with Scalia’s personal and judicial philosophy, he is a very important figure and justice. … I wanted to present his philosophy fairly. It is critical for the development of the law that we understand seminal legal figures, both scholars and judges. Scalia was very supportive of my effort, although there were so many questions that I would have liked to have asked him. He liked the idea that a liberal was writing the book and looked forward to debating me on it.

Check out the book upstairs in the Reading Room at KF 8745.S33 D67 2017.

Our collection supports the scholarly and clinical work of faculty and students. Let us know if you have a suggestion for a new book.

1. Ronald Collins, “Ask the author: A critique of a concept – Dorsen on Justice Scalia’s jurisprudence”, SCOTUSblog (Apr. 15, 2017), http://www.scotusblog.com/2017/04/ask-author-critique-concept-dorsen-justice-scalias-jurisprudence.

New on the shelves – March 2017

book cover imageOur list of new books is updated. Last month, the Law Library received a wide variety of materials, from the entire run of The Good Wife on DVD to books on international arbitration issues.

One of our new titles is Unwarranted: Policing Without Permission, by NYU Law professor (and Director of the Policing Project) Barry Friedman. In the book, Professor Friedman argues

We allow… [policing] agencies to operate in secret and to decide how to police us, rather than calling the shots ourselves. And the courts, which we depended upon to supervise policing, have let us down entirely.1

Professor Friedman talked with Law Professor and Volokh Conspiracy author Orin Kerr about the book in March. Listen to their debate over at Fed-Soc.org. After you take in the debate, check out the book upstairs in the Reading Room at KF 5399 .F75 2017.

Our collection supports the scholarly and clinical work of faculty and students. Let us know if you have a suggestion for a new book.

1. Barry Friedman, Orin S. Kerr, & John G. Malcolm, “Unwarranted: Policing Without Permission by Barry Friedman – Podcast”, The Federalist Society: Multimedia (March 15, 2017), http://www.fed-soc.org/multimedia/detail/unwarranted-policing-without-permission-by-barry-friedman-podcast.

Hours – Reading & Examination, Summer

library-hoursOur hours are different in late April and early May because of Reading & Exam period. After that, hours will change again for the summer. Check our up-to-date calendar: Law Library Hours.

Our visitor policy is also different during the Reading & Exam period so that our space is conducive to study. During that time — April 24 through May 10 — only UCI Law students and UCI faculty and staff can use the Law Library.

Related links: UCI Law Academic Calendar | Law Library Hours

Like stats?

stata pictureSTATA is now available in the law Library! We’ve installed STATA/IC (up to 2,047 variables) for all of your non-R data-crunching needs. It’s on just one PC in the law library computer lab for now. (Let us know if you think a different arrangement would work better for the student body!)

book coverSTATA is a popular statistics package that can handle datasets that are larger than what Excel can work with. Looking for some tips? We’ve got you covered there, too. Before you go to the lab, stop downstairs to grab A Gentle Introduction to Stata, in the stacks on the first floor at HA 32 .A26 2016.

Legal Research in Practice – Fri. 5/12

 

 

 

Friday, May 12.
9:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. in MPAA 420.
Select two sessions and get practical tips on research and job success in different jurisdictions and settings.

RSVP online by April 30 so that we can tailor the sessions to your job placements and guarantee enough snacks.

For the students who will be doing transactional or international legal work this summer, you are welcome to attend but you may also want to set up an individualized training with a librarian. For transactional, email Lisa Junghahn at ljunghahn@law.uci.edu. For international, email Jessica Pierucci at jpierucci@law.uci.edu.

Can’t make it? Look out for a follow-up email with links to online documentation.

Celebration of Books – 4/10

photo of four professors at 2016 event
Professor Michele Goodwin, Dean Erwin Chemerinsky, Professor Richard Hasen, and Professor Christopher Whytock at the 2016 Celebration of Books.

The entire UCI Law Community is welcome to the Law Library’s Eighth Annual Celebration of Books on Monday, April 10, 2017.  Join us in the Reading Room as we highlight and acknowledge the publications authored and co-authored by UCI Law Faculty from March 2016 through March 2017.

  • 10:00 a.m.: Coffee and pastries in the Library vestibule.
  • 10:15 a.m.: The event, including remarks by the authors, begins.

This year, we are honored to celebrate Dean Erwin Chemerinsky and Joe DiMento, Catherine Fisk, Melody Lembke, Christopher Leslie, Carrie Menkel-Meadow, Katie Porter, Tony Reese, and Song Richardson.