Category Archives: Library news

New on the shelves – July 2015

Our list of new books is now updated.dying-with-dignity-cover

July was an eclectic month for new books, with subjects ranging from grocery store law, to a history of legal aid in the U.S., to law in the work of philosopher Slavoj Žižek.

One of our new books is Dying with Dignity by Professor Giza Lopes. Assisted death has been in the statewide news this month1 as the California legislature reconsiders right-to-die legislation, and UCI is hosting a public debate on Doctor Assisted Suicide in September with Law School Dean Erwin Chemerinsky and School of Medicine Professor Aaron Kheriaty. Dying with Dignity provides historical and comparative context for the issue. From the publisher’s abstract:

“Spanning a period from 1906 to the present day, [the book] examines how and why pleas for legalization of “euthanasia” made at the beginning of the 20th century were transmuted into the physician-assisted suicide laws in existence today, in the United States as well as around the world. After an introductory section that discusses the phenomenon of “medicalization” of death, author Giza Lopes, PhD, covers the history of the legal development of “aid-in-dying” in the United States, focusing on case studies from the late 1900s to today, then addresses assisted death in select European nations. The concluding section discusses what the past legal developments and decisions could portend for the future of assisted death.”

Check it out downstairs in the Stacks at K 3611.E95 L67 2015.

The Law Library’s collection is constantly growing as we purchase books and other resources to support the scholarly and clinical work of faculty and students. Please let us know if you have a suggestion for a new book.

1. See, e.g., Patrick McGreevy & Chris Megerian, California Lawmakers Revive Measures on Assisted Suicide, Smoking Age, L.A. Times (Aug. 18, 2015), http://www.latimes.com/local/political/la-me-pc-california-lawmakers-bring-back-aid-in-dying-bill-for-special-session-20150817-story.html.

Study Room Reservations (pilot program 2015-16)

Upstairs. One of the study rooms.

One of the study rooms.

Law students can now reserve study rooms online up to two weeks in advance.

Check out your key at the Service Counter when your reservation begins. To book a room:

  1. Choose one of the study rooms in the Law Library:
  2. Click “Book it”
    book-it-snip
  3. Use the retro-cool online booking system to choose the date and time. Note: be courteous to fellow students:
    • Only book once per day, and only book up to two weeks in advance.
    • Make sure your group size fits the group-use rooms.
    • Not sure if your multimedia need works in our multimedia room? Talk to Law Library staff before booking.

We’d appreciate any feedback you have on the system as we test it out!

New on the shelves – May 2015

whats-wrong-with-copying-cover Our list of new books is now updated.

In May, the Law Library received books on women and the law, human rights, intellectual property, and international law, among many other topics.

One of our new books is What’s Wrong with Copying? by Professor Abraham Drassinower. From the publisher’s abstract:

“[The author] frames an author’s work as a communicative act and asserts that copyright infringement is best understood as an unauthorized appropriation of another person’s speech. According to this interpretation, copyright doctrine does not guarantee an author’s absolute rights over a work but only such rights as are consistent with both the nature of the work as speech and with the structure of the dialogue in which it participates.”

Check it out upstairs in the Reading Room at K 1447.15 .D73 2015.

The Law Library’s collection is constantly growing as we purchase books and other resources to support the scholarly and clinical work of faculty and students. Please let us know if you have a suggestion for a new book.

New on the shelves – April 2015

psychology-of-law-coverOur list of new books is now updated.

In April, the Law Library received books on women and the law, human rights, intellectual property, and EU legal issues, among many other topics.

One of our new books is The Psychology of Law: Human Behavior, Legal Institutions, and Law, an American Psychological Association title by Professors Bruce D. Sales and Daniel A. Krauss. From the publisher’s abstract:

“[T]he authors present a roadmap for how criminal justice and forensic researchers can use research to describe, explain, predict, and provide solutions for legal situations that can have a real impact on judges, juries, and the legal profession at large.”

Check it out upstairs in the Reading Room at KF 385 .S25 2015.

Interested in this area? You can also check out books on campus by UCI Professor Elizabeth Loftus—a leading expert on human memory and eyewitness testimony—by searching the catalog for author: Loftus, Elizabeth.

The Law Library’s collection is constantly growing as we purchase books and other resources to support the scholarly and clinical work of faculty and students. Please let us know if you have a suggestion for a new book.

Bar Exam Awesomeness: Study Less, Study Smart

According to Urban Dictionary, the bar is:

A typical right of passage, a cliche event that all would be lawyers must go through. Involves two months of unbelievably boring lectures, followed by spending the rest of the day studying in a law library or other similarly isolated and secluded environment. . . .

According to psychology professor Marty Lobdell, there are six strategies for studying smart.

  1. Study in chunks.  Take quick fun breaks.  Then, reward yourself at the end of the day!
  2. Study in a dedicated space, one where you are conditioned to study.
  3. Study actively.  Don’t worry about facts first.  Focus on internalizing concepts.  Put them into your own words, and actively quiz yourself along the way.  Make sure you are able to recall concepts beyond just gaining recognition.
  4. Keep notes during your bar lectures, and make sure you clarify and supplement after.
  5. Summarize and teach what you learn.  Whenever possible, tell a friend or family member about key concepts.  I call this:  Tell a family friend something about the law.
  6. Survey, question, read, recite, review.  Engage with your readings by getting an overview of the materials, ask yourself questions, read, and find ways to reiterate.
  7. Use mnemonic devices to remember facts for better recall.  Use acronyms, common sayings, and image associations.

Other advice for your summer of study.  Sleep.  Eat.  Get outside.  Socialize.  Sleep some more.

Finally, if it helps, remember that not everyone passes the bar on the first try.  Many people have failed before, including First Lady Michelle Obama, presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton, California Governor Jerry Brown, and Kathleen Sullivan, former Dean of Stanford Law School.

New on the shelves – March 2015

coverOur list of new books is now updated.

In March, the Law Library received books on criminal law, international law, federalism, and legal careers, among many other topics.

One of our new books is Happiness & the Law, a University of Chicago Press title by Professors John Bronsteen, Christopher Buccafusco, and Jonathan S. Masur. From the publisher’s abstract:

“Drawing on new research in psychology, neuroscience, and economics, the authors. . . assess how the law affects people’s quality of life—and how it can do so in a better way. Taking readers through some of the common questions about and objections to the use of happiness research in law and policy, they consider two areas in depth: criminal punishment and civil lawsuits.”

Check it out downstairs in the Stacks at K 380 .B765 2015.

The Law Library’s collection is constantly growing as we purchase books and other resources to support the scholarly and clinical work of faculty and students. Please let us know if you have a suggestion for a new book.

Put the pieces together

library-puzzle Take a break from studying and work on the UCI Law Library community puzzle. Look for it downstairs, right at the bottom of the stairs.  (Next to the annotated and official United States Code volumes in print!)

Brought to you by the Law Library’s Access & Circulation department staff members.

NYTimes.com for UCI Law

nyt-mobileNew! New York Times digital subscriptions for members of the UCI Law community!

In case you missed the April 1 email from one of the law librarians, instructions for registration are available:

NYT @ UCI Law Q&A – docs.google.com/a/lawnet.uci.edu

You’ll need to log in with your @lawnet account to view the instructions.

This subscription is limited to the Law School community. Contact the reference desk with questions.

New on the shelves – February 2015

appealing-to-justice-coverOur list of new books is now updated.

In February, the Law Library received books on legal history, international law, and legal practice, among many other topics.

One of our new books is by UC Irvine criminology scholars Kitty Calavita and Valerie Jenness: Appealing to Justice: Prisoner Grievances, Rights, and Carceral Logic. From the publisher’s abstract:

“Drawing on sometimes startlingly candid interviews with [California] prisoners and prison staff, as well as on official records, the authors walk us through the byzantine grievance process, which begins with prisoners filing claims and ends after four levels of review, with corrections officials usually denying requests for remedies. Appealing to Justice is both an unprecedented study of disputing in an extremely asymmetrical setting and a rare glimpse of daily life inside this most closed of institutions.”

Check it out downstairs—shelved with other titles about California criminal law—in the California Room at KFC 1181.5 C35 2015.

The Law Library’s collection is constantly growing as we purchase books and other resources to support the scholarly and clinical work of faculty and students. Please let us know if you have a suggestion for a new book.

Celebration of Books – Thurs. 3/19

Prof. Southworth

Professor Ann Southworth at the first Celebration of Books, in 2010.

The entire UCI Law Community is welcome to the Law Library’s Sixth Annual Celebration of Books.  Join us in the Reading Room as we highlight and acknowledge the publications authored and co-authored by UCI Law Faculty from April 2014 through March 2015.

  • 10:30 am: Coffee and pastries will be offered in the Library vestibule.
  • 11:00 am: The event, including remarks by the authors, will begin.

This year, we are honored to celebrate Dean Erwin Chemerinsky and Professors Joseph DiMento, Catherine Fisk, Richard Hasen, Sarah Lawsky, Christopher Leslie, Carrie Menkel-Meadow, Douglas NeJaime, Katherine Porter, Gregory Shaffer, and Ann Southworth.