Category Archives: Library news

New on the shelves – February 2015

appealing-to-justice-coverOur list of new books is now updated.

In February, the Law Library received books on legal history, international law, and legal practice, among many other topics.

One of our new books is by UC Irvine criminology scholars Kitty Calavita and Valerie Jenness: Appealing to Justice: Prisoner Grievances, Rights, and Carceral Logic. From the publisher’s abstract:

“Drawing on sometimes startlingly candid interviews with [California] prisoners and prison staff, as well as on official records, the authors walk us through the byzantine grievance process, which begins with prisoners filing claims and ends after four levels of review, with corrections officials usually denying requests for remedies. Appealing to Justice is both an unprecedented study of disputing in an extremely asymmetrical setting and a rare glimpse of daily life inside this most closed of institutions.”

Check it out downstairs—shelved with other titles about California criminal law—in the California Room at KFC 1181.5 C35 2015.

The Law Library’s collection is constantly growing as we purchase books and other resources to support the scholarly and clinical work of faculty and students. Please let us know if you have a suggestion for a new book.

Celebration of Books – Thurs. 3/19

Prof. Southworth

Professor Ann Southworth at the first Celebration of Books, in 2010.

The entire UCI Law Community is welcome to the Law Library’s Sixth Annual Celebration of Books.  Join us in the Reading Room as we highlight and acknowledge the publications authored and co-authored by UCI Law Faculty from April 2014 through March 2015.

  • 10:30 am: Coffee and pastries will be offered in the Library vestibule.
  • 11:00 am: The event, including remarks by the authors, will begin.

This year, we are honored to celebrate Dean Erwin Chemerinsky and Professors Joseph DiMento, Catherine Fisk, Richard Hasen, Sarah Lawsky, Christopher Leslie, Carrie Menkel-Meadow, Douglas NeJaime, Katherine Porter, Gregory Shaffer, and Ann Southworth.

New on the shelves – January 2015

Our list of new books is now updated.

book coverIn January, the Law Library received books on intellectual property, immigration practice, international human rights, and legal writing, among many other topics.

One of our new books is The View from the Bench and Chambers: Examining Judicial Process and Decision Making on the U.S. Courts of Appeals. From the publisher’s abstract:

“[The book combines] a series of quantitative analyses of judicial decisions with the perspectives gained from in-depth interviews with the judges and their law clerks.”

Check it out upstairs—shelved with other titles about U.S. appellate courts—in the Reading Room at KF 8750.B69 2014.

January can be a busy month as we process the end-of-year rush; this January we put over 150 new books and movies on the shelves. Other titles that might interest law students include:

  • Crude. 2009 documentary. The filmmakers call it “[a]n inside look at the infamous $27 billion “Amazon Chernobyl” case.” KF 1298 .C78 2009
  • Redeeming the Dream: the Case for Marriage Equality. By Hollingsworth attorneys David Boies and Theodore Olson. KF 228.H645 B65 2014
  • Beginner’s Guide to Public Housing Conversion under RAD. Published by the ABA Forum on Affordable Housing. KF 5729 .M33 2014

The Law Library’s collection is constantly growing as we purchase books and other resources to support the scholarly and clinical work of faculty and students. Please let us know if you have a suggestion for a new book.

New on the shelves – December 2014

Our list of new books is now updated.

cover-law-liberty-pursuit-of-terrorism

In December, the Law Library received books on legal careers, trial practice, international law, and the WTO, among other topics.

One of our new books is Law, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Terrorism, by Roger Douglas. Published by University of Michigan Press, the book:

“compares responses to terrorism by five liberal democracies—the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand—over the past 15 years. [It also] examines each nation’s development and implementation of counterterrorism law, specifically in the areas of information-gathering, the definition of terrorist offenses, due process for the accused, detention, and torture and other forms of coercive questioning.”

Check it out downstairs in the Stacks at K 5256 .D68 2014.

The Law Library’s collection is constantly growing as we purchase books and other resources to support the scholarly and clinical work of faculty and students. Please let us know if you have a suggestion for a new book.

Legal Research for the 1L (Intersession)

Congratulations to UCI Law 1Ls for finishing your first term of law school!

You have successfully made the transition to thinking like a lawyer.  From now on, law school will be busy and (at times) stressful – but never as hard as your first classes!

Your first class as a seasoned law student is Legal Research (Intersession).

This class will run from Monday, January 5 to Friday, January 9, and will include a pre-class assignment (due by 11.59 p.m. on January 4) and a final assignment (due by 11.59 p.m. on January 30).

The class is designed to prepare you to take on the research assignments typically encountered at school and in the workplace.  Concepts will build on those introduced in your first semester of Lawyering Skills.

Before the first class, you will need to login to TWEN, and

  1. Read the syllabus.
  2. Complete Class 1 Reading.
  3. Complete a Pre-Class multiple choice assignment.

The Pre-Class assignment is located in the Homework Drop Box.  You will need to use your Student Paper Number as your TWEN Anonymous ID.  Access your anonymous Student Paper Number through MyCourses, http://apps.law.uci.edu/mycourses/

The Pre-Class assignment is five questions, and worth 5% of your course grade.  You will have one hour to complete the five questions from the time of starting.

The law librarians are very excited about this class, and look forward to working with each of you to further develop your legal research skills.   We have made every effort to integrate our course learning goals with the law school curriculum, and to ensure a positive student experience!

Send pre-class questions to your course instructor or to Lisa at Ljunghahn@law.uci.edu.

New on the shelves – November 2014

Our list of new books is now updated.

In November, the Law Library received books on international environmental law, family law, legal careers, and immigration, among other topics.

One of our new books is an updated edition of The VAWA Manual : Immigration Relief for Abused Immigrants from the ILRC (Immigrant Legal Resource Center). Check it out in the Reading Room at KF 4819 .A72 2014.

This title is highlighted in our research guide for law students in the Domestic Violence Clinic, as are many other ILRC titles.  Looking for more ILRC books? Search our catalog for “Immigrant Legal Resource Center.”

The Law Library’s collection is constantly growing as we purchase books and other resources to support the scholarly and clinical work of faculty and students. Please let us know if you have a suggestion for a new book.

New on the shelves – October 2014

Our list of new books is now updated.

In October, the Law Library received books on legal careers, environmental law, international human rights, and international IP, among other topics.

cover-case-againstOne of our new books is The Case Against the Supreme Court, by Dean Erwin Chemerinsky. Related interviews and book reviews are highlighted in several 2014 items from UCI Law in the News. Law Library copies are shelved upstairs in the Faculty Display at KF 9742 .C46 2014.

Looking for other books by law faculty? They are are all tagged in our catalog with “UCI School of Law faculty publication.”

The Law Library’s collection is constantly growing as we purchase books and other resources to support the scholarly and clinical work of faculty and students. Please let us know if you have a suggestion for a new book.

New on the shelves – September 2014

Our list of new books is now updated.

Book coverIn September, the Law Library received books on family law, environmental law, international law, and international IP, among other topics.

Several of our new titles focus on Native American law because we are expanding our collection in this area in response to student and faculty interest. One of these newly-purchased titles is Enduring Legacies :  Native American Treaties and Contemporary Controversies. It’s shelved downstairs in the Stacks at KIE 110 .E53 2004.

Students working on pro bono projects that touch on this area might consider browsing the shelves downstairs for other titles, or searching Encore for books tagged with “Indians of North America laws” and related subjects.

The Law Library’s collection is constantly growing as we purchase books and other resources to support the scholarly and clinical work of faculty and students. Please let us know if you have a suggestion for a new book.

New on the shelves – June 2014

Our list of new books is now updated.
book cover

In June, the Law Library received books on tax, environmental law, international law, and international trade, among other topics.

One of our new titles is the Pulitzer Prize winner Devil in the Grove : Thurgood Marshall, the Groveland Boys and the Dawn of a New America by Gilbert King. It’s shelved upstairs in the Reading Room at KF 224.G76 K56.

The author and his book were profiled in the New York Times on April 24, 2013: 

The book, about four black men falsely accused of raping Norma Lee Padgett, a 17-year-old white woman in Groveland, Fla., in 1949, unearthed a largely forgotten chapter in the long history of racial injustice in the United States, and explored, in painstaking detail, the tactics used by Thurgood Marshall, the future Supreme Court justice, to chip away at the foundations of Jim Crow law.

The Law Library’s collection is constantly growing as we purchase books and other resources to support the scholarly and clinical work of faculty and students. Please let us know if you have a suggestion for a new book.