Current Classes

2017

The following UTeach classes were taught during Spring 2017, under the leadership of Katey Hobkirk. Please click on one of the links below to be redirected to the course description of the course, including a biography of the instructor and class listing. You may also find the following courses listed in the Spring Quarter 2017 Schedule of Classes listed under University Studies 7.

Mythology and Popular Culture
Poverty of Language
Love and Technology
The Gypsy Myth
Introduction to Gangs
Sociology of TV Animation
Malls and Sprawls
Women and the French Revolution
Killers Among Us
Fast Fashion USA
20th Century Terrorism
Ice Cream Science

Mythology and Popular Culture

Katey Hobkirk
Majors:
Classics, English, and Education Sciences

Biography: Salvete omnes! My name is Katey Hobkirk, I am a fourth your triple majoring in Classics, English, and Education Sciences. On campus, I work as a Peer Academic Advisor for the School of Humanities, a Peer Mentor for the School of Education, and as the UTeach Student Coordinator. Off campus, I work as a Latin tutor and a Co-Facilitator for the Tilly’s Life Center. Working with UTeach puts all my majors together! I am using my Education Major to teach, my English Major to analyze the media we will be going over in class, and my Classics Major to put this material into the context of the original mythology. In what little spare time I have, I enjoy relaxing with my squad and cuddling my cat, Django.

Course Description: Let us delve into a world where the Greek Gods are real, myths come alive, and adventure reigns. From Disney’s adaptation of Hercules to the acclaimed God of War franchise, there is nearly no genre that is untouched by mythical greatness.  But why do we still use these ancient tales in our modern media? And what do these adaptations tell us about our society as a whole? Find out for yourself in this class by engaging with mythical adaptations in the form of Movies, Graphic Novels, Video Games, and Literature. If you are interested in mythology, popular culture, or Classics in general, enroll and let us embark on an Odyssey of our own.

Enrollment Information:
Time: F 1-1:50pm
Place: HH 210
Course Code: 87631
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Cynthia Claxton
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Poverty of Language

Aya Labanieh
Majors:
Comparative Literature, Philosophy, and French

Biography: Hark! My name is Aya, a third year triple major in Comparative Literature, Philosophy, and French. My heart throbs and beats for academic study, and so naturally I plan on pursuing a Ph.D. in the humanities after my undergraduate years are complete. Given the job market, in a few years you’ll likely see me living out of a box off the side of the 405, pretending to be Count Dracula. I have resigned myself to such a life, and if I get to keep my books and fake vampire teeth, I’m happy. In my free time, I dabble in politics, lending my energy to political campaigns and projects in my district and scampering around trying to bring unruly elitists to heel in my knee-high leather boots and eye-liner war-paint.

When I am not trying annex the country and name it after myself, I spend my days in the fashion of all Byronic heroes: brooding in half-deserted streets, wading waist-deep in weltschmertz, and referring to all the worldly occupations of this life as utterly blasé. 

Course Description: The main issue my seminar will address is the inherent incommunicability that exists between any two human beings who, by virtue of their humanity, each contain unique and separate worlds inside of them. Many things hinder our ability to express ourselves to one another; sometimes language itself does not contain the proper words, other times the discursive or political structures we operate within prevent us from perceiving our surroundings as others outside that structure would. Incommunicability is closely intertwined with notions of impotence, patriarchy, power, and irony. My course will explore each and every one of these topics in hopes of illuminating how poor of a job language really does at capturing the swirling galaxies that are ourselves. In doing so, perhaps I will convince you all to–every so often–give your fellow humans the benefit of the doubt.

Enrollment Information:
Time: Tu 11-11:50am
Place: DBH 1420
Course Code: 87633
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Nasrin Rahimieh
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Love and Technology

David Ngo
Majors:
English and Public Health Policy

Biography: My name is David Ngo, and I’m a fourth year English major with an Emphasis in Creative Writing. I’m also the Vice President of the Creative Writers’ Guild, an amateur screenwriter, and an avid moviegoer. Why am I teaching a class on love and romance? Mainly, it’s because romance is the genre that I place myself in as a writer. I love to explore the dynamics of relationships and just what relationships really are. In my spare time, I like to explore new places in the city, make playlists of sad/emotional music, and lie down in the grass under a shady tree.

Course Description: Have you ever used Tinder or some other form of dating app? How many times have you used it to hook up? To find a romantic relationship? Think back to the early ‘90s, and how these things were achieved differently—how love was achieved differently. There is an endless amount of people who have tried to discover how modern technology has affected the way we see romantic love: Philosophers, Academics, Scientists, and even well-known comedian Aziz Ansari! Take the opportunity to venture into this pool of questions, with topics such as marriage and monogamy, the different kinds of love, and the accessibility of romance. Online dating, texting, and sexting are all wonderful but they also have flaws. Why is that? Let’s find out.

Enrollment Information:
Time: Tu 2-3:20pm
Place: LLIB 101A
Course Code: 87634
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Daniel Gross
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The Gypsy Myth

Glenna Morin
Major:
History
Minor:
Russian Studies

Biography: Sastipe! My name is Glenna, I am a fourth year History major with a minor in Russian Studies. I also work as a Global Connect intern meaning I am part of a team that teaches 9th grade international studies at Laguna Hills High School. History is riddled with mysteries and UTeach has provided me with the opportunity to unravel one hiding in plain sight for all of you. Outside of class I can usually be found on some sort of adventure (because anything is an adventure if you make it one right?). Trouble tends to find me though… Likes: Music, coffee, fashion, books, memes, those people who scream in the woods to get Bigfoot’s attention, and horror movies Dislikes: Broccoli, pineapple on pizza, and the live action DBZ movie

Course Description: “She was a gypsy, as soon as you unravelled the many layers to her wild spirit she was on her next quest to discover her magic. She was relentless like that, the woman didn’t need no body but an open road, a pen and a couple of sunsets.” ― Nikki Rowe Mysterious, sensual, and fiery- the near fantastical nature of the gypsy has long served artists as a muse. From Carmen to The Hunchback of Notre Dame, the images of the beautiful dancer girl, the quick-handed thieves, and the crone telling fortunes (for a fee of course) are riddled throughout popular media. But who exactly are these people? Where did they come from and, are they even real? Or could it be that the origins of the oh-so romantic image of the gypsy lies in a sinister tangle of racism and slavery in a post-crusades Europe… Students will have the chance to explore a culture whose study only recently gained popularity in the 1990’s and is taught in very few universities across the U.S.. From a rich history to a language few Americans ever hear, this class will act as a crash course on a vibrant people and their unique society.

Enrollment Information:
Time: W 12-12:50pm
Place: HH 224
Course Code: 87635
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Aglaya Kirillovna Glebova
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Introduction to Gangs

Jasmeet Singh
Majors:
Business Economics and Education Sciences

Biography: My name is Jasmeet Singh. I’m a third year Business Economics and Education Sciences double major. I was born and raised in Carlsbad, CA and I moved to Irvine three years ago to attend this University. After taking a couple gangs courses during my first year, I became very interested in gangs and began my research. My interest stems from the idea of why people decide to get involved in these types of organizations and how gangs use emotions, weapons, and power to control others. In my free time, I love to dance, watch my turtles swim and go to the beach.

Course Description: Defining what a “gang” is has become nearly difficult in our contemporary society. Gangs have been around since the 12th century and are still very active in our society today. This seminar will be focused on the history and formation of gangs and gang violence tracing all the way back to the 1600’s until the present and the illegitimate activities that gangs are able to perform nationally and transnationally.

Enrollment Information:
Time: Tu 10-10:50am
Place: DBH 1420
Course Code: 87636
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Caesar Sereseres
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Sociology of TV Animation

Jasmine Lopez-Logan
Majors:
Sociology and Political Sciences
Minor: Art History

Biography: Hi y’all, welcome comic lovers and weeabos alike! My name is Jasmine Lopez – Logan, I am a current 2nd year here at UCI, double majoring in Sociology and Political Science and minoring in Art History. My first spark of interest for this topic came from my own personal interaction with U.S comic series like Batman and Superman and their adaptions into TV animation. What made me double take at these renditions though was not its artistry (while it was amazing) or its actual story but rather the way I digested these works. Whenever I read comics I constantly felt engaged and aware of the material I was consuming (its morals, hero’s values, social commentary) yet on TV I would become enraptured and lost in the show only to realize much later its possible meaning. Why? I experienced this time and time again even with its international sister comic type, Manga and Anime. So with the awesome resources here at UCI, I decided to tie in my love for Sociology with my own personal question to create an academic space for animation lovers and readers alike!! That being said, I can’t wait to meet you all and I hope you’re as excited for our time together this Spring Quarter as I am!

Course Description: Cartoons are safe, they lead their young audience to believe the lives of imaginative characters like: Naruto Uzumaki the No.1 Leaf Village Shinobi or Steven Universe the optimistic fourteen year old half gem/half human boy, couldn’t possibly have any relation to “real-life experiences”. And while it may be true their spectacular adventures may not be in our likely future, what makes these shows so engaging is their individual character relatability and impactful symbolism. For example, could Naruto’s Shinobi War be commentary on the rising tension between the West and Middle East infamously driven by certain militant groups? Essentially, the objective of this course is to identify, observe, and analyze social interaction of popular TV animations with audiences to obtain better understanding of their role in our society. By the end of our time together students will be expected to have achieved: an introductory grasp of the main concepts, themes, theories, and terminology related to the field of study found in global business relations, political attitudes, and personal conversation.

Enrollment Information:
Time: Tu 12:30-1:20pm
Place: DBH 1422
Course Code:87637
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Sabrina Strings
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Malls and Sprawls

Huitzijared Contreras Miguel
Major:
History and International Studies

Biography: Hello there! My name is Huitzijared Contreras Miguel. I am a 4th year senior double majoring in History and International Studies. I am a first generation college student and will be the first in my family to graduate from university this June. Raised in Los Angeles in the San Fernando Valley, I became inspired by movies that used my town as setting. I have gone to many filming locations, seen a zillion LA movies, and visited almost all Instagramable cafes in LA. As a part of UCEAP, I spent 6 months studying abroad in the Netherlands while exploring my photography skills throughout Europe; reading about wines, and admiring art and architecture. Most recently I participated in UCDC where I interned for Senator Dianne Feinstein at Capitol Hill (and loved every minute of it!). You will most likely find me at any cafe reading magazines about foreign policy and thinking of ways to improve the world.

Course Description: On the sunny outskirts of Los Angeles is the San Fernando Valley, a region short on exciting pastimes, but full of malls. This class looks at the duality of suburban commercial spaces. Films such as Clueless, Boogie Nights, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, and TV shows like Parks and Rec, The Office, and Gilmore Girls all used the Valley in different ways—but echoed the social, economic and political changes that occurred during the 1970s, 80s, 90s, and 2000s. Using popularized mass media as a guide, “Malls and Sprawls” will analyze the various factors that led to the creation of the new postwar consumer culture alongside Southern California’s suburbs specifically looking into themes of race, socio-economic patterns, suburban development, and popular culture.

Enrollment Information:
Time: W 10-10:50am
Place: SSL 105
Course Code: 87638
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Anita Casavantes-Bradford
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Women and the French Revolution

Kate Vu
Major:
European Studies
Minor:
French

Biography: Hey hi hello! My name is Kate Vu and I am a fourth year majoring in European Studies and minoring in French. Outside of academics, I am an alto in the UCI acapella group Vermillion Vocalists. I am also an avid traveller and my two favourites cities that I’ve travelled to so far are Strasbourg, France and London, England. I am a huge Netflixer and I love watching tv shows – chances are if you name it, I’ve probably seen it! If you ever see me around campus, feel free to come and say hi! 🙂 After taking several courses at UCI on the French Revolution, I realised that there was a lack of focus on the roles of women. This motivated me to do my own research and I found that a great deal of historians and even history textbooks have failed to acknowledge women’s significance during the French Revolution. Through my course, I hope to reveal these discrepancies and their influence on modern day feminism.

Course Description: How active and how influential were women during the French Revolution? This course will begin with the start of the French Revolution in 1789 and will continue until its end in 1799. Together we will understand the role that women played in the political atmosphere of this historical period. We will also explore the ways in which women impacted the Revolution and how the Revolution impacted women, not only in France, but throughout the world. Additionally, we will examine the representation (or lack thereof) of femininity during the Revolution as well as the evolution of feminism through historical documents like the Declaration of the Rights of Woman and of the Female Citizen, notable female figures such as Marie Antoinette, and artistic representations. The course will analyse how the Revolution influenced the course of modern feminism. Through a mixture of primary and secondary sources, we will engage in an interdisciplinary study of how the French Revolution influenced the course of modern feminism.

Enrollment Information:
Time: Tu 11-11:50am
Place: TBA
Course Code: 87639
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Ian Coller
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Killers Among Us

Lauren Powers
Major:
English (Emphasis in Creative Writing)

Biography: Hello horror fans and fellow Anteaters! My name is Lauren Powers and I’m a 5th year English major with an emphasis in Creative Writing. I’m a Slytherin, backpacker, and indie gamer. I started my life journey teaching English in Japan where I lived, worked, and studied Japanese language, music and literature. I first started working as a TA to a JET instructor, and soon became the teacher myself when her contract ended! After that, I decided I loved teaching, and came back to the US where I’ve been teaching AP English at a private academy. When I’m not teaching, researching, and trying to apply to grad school, I’m writing short stories. Looking at my picture (taken in front of the Palace of Versailles), you may think I write romance–but I’m a horror writer. I write stories hoping to make readers sleep with their lights on at night. With that being said, welcome to Killers Among Us–with my mentor Dr. Jayne Lewis–where we will descend to the darkest depths of the human mind and experience horror unlike any other.

Course Description: What is a serial killer, and why can’t people get enough of them? From Jack the Ripper to Charlie Mansion, we will analyze how serial killers are made into killer celebrities. You will learn about the five different serial killer archetypes: The Bragger, The Charmer, The Expert Manipulator, The Power Junkie and The Average Joe. How does race, gender, and privilege enter into the portrayal of serial killing? We will learn about serial killers in mass media, and how this portrayal changes the way we view crime in society. Each week, we will focus on a single serial killer and discuss what archetype they are classified under. From literature to film, and even newspaper articles, you will be asked to read/watch and discuss films such as “Silence of the Lambs,” and “Dexter.” Warning: The following class will contain graphic material including violence, blood, and other sensitive material. Enter if you dare!

Enrollment Information:
Time: W 1-1:50pm
Place: DBH 1420
Course Code: 87640
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Jayne Lewis
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Fast Fashion USA

Max Piercey
Majors:
Sociology and Education Sciences

Biography: My name is Max Piercey and I am a 4th year double major in Sociology and Education. Before coming to UCI, I lived in a small town that gave me very few options for shopping, but it didn’t stop my love for fashion. I was forced to be creative with what I wore, by going thrift shopping or up-cycling old clothing. While moving to Irvine finally gave me the opportunity to go shopping at malls, I found that my relationship with clothing is ever-changing. One of the most significant shifts that I had in my relationship with fashion was when I started studying sociology, and more specifically, consumerism in the United States. I began thinking about how fashion is so much larger than a signifier of my individual identity and the major factor it plays in U.S. culture. Now, I want to teach the course Fast Fashion USA to share with others what I have learned about clothing, and to further explore how it affects the world around us.

Course Description: Heidi Klum’s iconic quote, “In fashion, one day you’re in, the next day you’re out,” has never been so relevant to the fashion world as it is today. While the fashion industry was previously broken into two seasons, summer and winter, today there are over 50 seasons, allowing trends to quickly come and go. This makes it an exciting time for students to explore how fashion designers and large clothing companies create fashion and apparel in this fast paced environment. In this course, students will discuss the production of fashion, in addition to the consumption of clothing in the U.S., and the affects it has on social structures and the environment. If you are interested in discovering how fashion reaches beyond the clothing we wear on our backs and how it can impact our future, join Fast Fashion USA.

Enrollment Information:
Time: W 11-11:50am
Place: DBH 1420
Course Code: 87641
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Allison Perlman
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20th Century Terrorism

Sam Nur
Majors:
Psychology & Social Behavior and Criminology, Law, & Society

Biography: My name is Sam and I’m a 5th year here at UCI. I am currently majoring in Psychology & Social Behavior as well as Criminology, Law, and Society. I work at the Transfer Student Center as a Peer Educator and am a supervisor in the UCI Global Connect program. I am also a researcher for the UCI STEP (Stress Emotion, and Health) Lab and am a research assistant for Prof. Dombrink. I enjoy reading and writing (sci-fi, fantasy, and historical fiction/non-fiction), computer games, music, and television/film when I have free time. Since I was a child I’ve had a great interest in military conflict and how its evolved since the bronze age. Conflicts involving terrorism came to the forefront of my research while studying at Saddleback college and UCI. The subject strikes a chord with me, as it is an intersection of several of my interests such as history, political science, and psychology. Now, through the U-Teach program, I have the opportunity to share what I’ve learned with my peers.

Course Description: How is a Terrorist defined? What were the economic and social impacts of 9/11? How would the elimination of ISIS’s leader affect the organization? By analyzing trends within 20th century terrorism, you can answer these questions and more. This discussion-based class will engage with terror-relevant subjects through lecture, discussion, and workshops. By exploring the evolution of different subjects within terrorism, such as attack methods, students will be better equipped to predict how the strategy may be utilized in the modern and future eras. To this end, students will evaluate and discuss events, methods, and individuals central to the evolution of terrorism in the 20th century.

Enrollment Information:
Time: M 4-4:50pm
Place: DBH 1420
Course Code: 87642
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Raymond Novaco
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Ice Cream Science

Zaki Molvi
Major:
Chemical Engineering

Biography: My name is Zaki and I love eating, making, and learning about ice cream. My own experiences with making ice cream at home, and figuring out how to improve it, have encouraged me to spread what I have learned to others. Of course, being an engineer by education and scientist by training, I hope to present an analytical approach to elucidate the astonishing properties of ice cream at the macroscopic and microscopic level. Whether you enjoy artisanal popsicles from Popbar, ice cream rolls from Chelo Creamery, or liquid nitrogen ice cream from Creamistry, this course will provide you with the expertise needed to create your new favorite ice cream!

Course Description: Ice cream is a delicious dessert enjoyed worldwide. Despite ice cream’s ubiquity, the science behind this frozen treat is seldom explained. We will take an in-depth look at the underlying science behind ice cream. We will delve into various topics in physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering as they relate to the design, manufacturing, and tasting of ice cream. Each lecture will consist of interactive discussions supplemented with demonstrations to substantiate topics covered in lecture. Of course, we will be making our own ice cream to attain a greater understanding of its properties. The lessons in this class will provide students with the knowhow to make their own ice cream flavors, at home or in a factory. No specific background in the sciences is required, beyond a general recollection of high school science.

Enrollment Information:
Time: F 12-12:50pm
Place: DBH 1420
Course Code: 87644
Faculty Mentor: Dr. Zuzanna Siwy
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