2016


The following UTeach classes were taught during Spring 2016, under the leadership of Jacky Schlegel. Please click on one of the links below to be redirected to the course description of the course, including a biography of the instructor and class listing. Following webreg.uci.edu, you may also find the follow courses listed in the Spring Quarter 2016 Schedule of Classes listed under University Studies 7.

Mythology and Rick Riordan
Islamic Feminism
Women, Wives and Harlots
History of Fandom
On Truth and Lies
Waters in Conflict
Malls & Sprawls
Turkey/Minorities

Mythology and Rick Riordan

Katey Hobkirk
Biography:
My name is Katey Hobkirk, I am a third year majoring in Classics, English, and Educational Screen Shot 2016-02-06 at 5.08.29 PMSciences. I am also the President of Eta Sigma Phi – Delta Sigma Chapter, which is a National Classics Honor Society, and I work as a Peer Academic Advisor for the School of Humanities. Working with UTeach puts all my majors together! I am using my Education Major to teach, my English Major to analyze Percy Jackson and the Olympians, and my Classics Major to put the book into the context of the original mythology. On my spare time I like to relax and hang out with my squad and cuddle my cat, Django.

Course Description:
Let us delve into a world where the Greek Gods are real, myths come alive, and adventure reigns. Acclaimed author Rick Riordan sucks us all into the world of Percy Jackson: a seemingly normal boy until he finds out that his father is a Greek God. In this class we will be reading The Lightning Thief, the first installment of the wildly popular Percy Jackson and the Olympians series. Together we will discuss the book and how Riordan adapts ancient mythology to fit a contemporary audience. Whether you have read the book, read the whole series, or never even heard of it at all, you will fit into this course seamlessly. If you are interested in mythology, literature, or just Percy Jackson, enroll and let us embark on an Odyssey of our own.

Enrollment Information:
Time: W 12:00-12:50pm
Place: ICS 213
Course Code: 87631

Faculty Mentor: Cynthia Claxton

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Islamic Feminism

Negin Fatahi
Biography:
My name is Negin. I’m a fourth year Political Science major with a minor in International Studies. I was born in Iran and moved to California when I was 12. My own experiences living in Screen Shot 2016-02-06 at 5.09.22 PMa country governed by Sharia Law made me curious about Islamic Law and how it affects women. As a result, I structured my education to fit my desire to better comprehend the many facets of Islamic Law. As a first year, I decided that learning Arabic would enhance my understanding of the Quran, which would enable me to grasp the applications of its principles. My interest in Muslim-majority societies, and in particular my specific attention to the role of women in those societies, introduced me to Islamic feminism. I have conducted nearly two years of research on Islamic feminism, reading works by various self-described Islamic feminist and reviewing passages of the Quran for better understanding. This seminar is the accumulation of those efforts.

Course Description:
The purpose of this seminar is to introduce Islamic Feminism as a form of Postcolonial feminism. We will analyze how an interchange of ideas between religion, culture, and feminism is possible. We will draw comparisons between Western feminism and Islamic feminism and explore the status of women in specific regions of the world. We will examine whether Islamic scripture supports women’s rights or serves as a hindrance for progress. In order to understand that Islamic feminism takes different shapes based on the culture and environment it is practiced in, we will look at case studies of majority Muslim Arab and non-Arab countries as well as Western countries. In looking at these countries, we will identify the strides they have made towards women’s rights and examine their family laws in order to understand the effect that Islamic feminism has had. Students with prior understandings about feminism or Islam will be able to combine and incorporate their knowledge with the material covered in this class. Ultimately students will be equipped with the knowledge to decide what their perceptions of Islamic feminism are.

Enrollment Information:
Time: W 12:00 – 12:50
Place: SSL 152
Course Code: 87632

Faculty Mentors: Dr. Murphy and Dr. Sheila Gail O’rourke

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Women, Wives and Harlots

Solange Tadros
Biography:
Hi my name is Solange Tadros, I am a 4th year Philosophy and French double major. I am a first generation Egyptian American immigrant. As an Egyptian, social norms and gender really played a role in my life while growing up in Egypt. When I moved to the U.S. my passion for gender equality and LGBT rights inspired me to Screen Shot 2016-02-06 at 5.07.07 PMresearch on social construct concerning gender studies, especially the way author’s historical period and social norms affect their perception of femininity and masculinity. Furthermore, as an International Peer coordinator, I am always interacting with different cultures that allow me to understand other people’s social norms depending on their gender expectations. In addition, as a French major, I was exposed to gender studies in my French 117 class that class helped me understand the way literature and films exhibit the social norms of the time period.

Course Description:Women, Wives, & Harlots: In 14th-19th century France

In this course, we will focus on the four representations of women in French society between the 14th through the 19th century. The purpose of the course is to analyze certain mediums like plays, short stories, and films in order to answer the following questions:

  • How do social roles put a strain on women’s behavior, morality, and sexuality?
  • How did women challenge the social constructs of their specific time period?
  • Did these archetypes redefine feminity, motherhood, or courtship?
  • Do these popular representations still construct society’s stereotypes of women?

Most importantly by the end of the course we will attempt to answer the following question: what does it mean to be a women according to the social constructs of the specific time period in France. We will look at the oldest love Story-Tristan and Yseut that still plays a central role in most of the romance genre of films and books. Additionally, we will look at the shift that was created by certain women who were coined the name “Précieuse”. These “Précieuse” challenged social norms and education, and they were early versions of feminism. We will then focus on popular films like “Marie Antoinette starring Kristen Dunst”, and the way films are influenced by the social paradigms of the century. Lastly, we will focus on the negative stereotypical connotations that still play a role in our perception of women by watching the classic film “Madame Bovary”.

Enrollment Information:
Time: Th 11-12:20
Place: TBA
Course Code: 87639

Faculty Mentors: Jane Newman and Andrea Marculescu

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History of Fandom

Samantha Engler
Biography:

I’m Samantha Engler and I am a senior and a History major. I mostly study the culture and Screen Shot 2016-02-06 at 5.09.01 PMsocial movements of the modern U.S.. Outside of class, I am a member of the Anteater Historical Association and a mentor in the Humanities Peer Mentor Program.

I have a confession. I am obsessed with TV. I am a full-time student and I also work full time but I somehow find a way to watch 15 different shows every week. When I’m not watching TV I’m probably in the kitchen or hanging out with my dogs.

This Spring I will be teaching a UTeach course on “The History of Fandom”. I chose this topic in order to combine my love for television with History. In this class we will look at the history of fans of everything from Star Trek to The Beatles to football.

Course Description:

As long as there has been media, there have been fans. The concept of “fans”, however, has evolved drastically. This class seeks to explore how fan culture and the perception thereof has changed over time. Through discussion, observation and immersion we will historicize prominent “fandoms” and analyze the presence of fans in modern society. We will take an interdisciplinary approach to the concept of fans, employing the tools of history, culture, psychology, media and art.

After establishing a history of groups such as Trekkies, Deadheads, Beatlemaniacs, we will look at modern practices of fans within our society. How does gender influence how people engage with media? Why do we think of fans of cartoons so differently than fans of opera? Why do some sports fans go to the point of rioting? How do media companies make money off of the work of their fans? These questions and more will be explored in “The History of Fandom” .

Enrollment Information:
Time: Th 11:00-12:20p
Place: TBA
Course Code: 87634

Faculty Mentors: Allison Perlman

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On Truth and Lies

Karen Siu
Biography:
Hi there! My name is Karen, and I’m a fourth-year majoring in English and minoring in ClassicaScreen Shot 2016-02-06 at 5.09.07 PMl Civilization and Latin. I am Secretary for the English Majors’ Association and Vice President for Eta Sigma Phi. I’m also in the Humanities Honors Program which is where I read Nietzsche’s “On Truth and Lying”, the inspiration for our class. After reading Nietzsche’s essay, I saw questions about truth and lying everywhere; Movies I watched, news articles I read, and my other classes all touched on truth and lies. I noticed how so many different facets of culture are fascinated by the relationship between telling the truth and telling lies. So in our class, we will examine the implications surrounding truth and lies in various discourses and contexts. When I’m not contemplating philosophical concepts or drowning in schoolwork, I enjoy binge-watching TV shows, reading, singing, and playing piano.

Course Description:
Are truth and lies really opposites? The duality surrounding the two concepts is ambiguous because there are many ways of being true and telling lies at the same time. In this seminar, we will examine the possibility of there being a truth and question how the formation of the concepts, “truth” and “lie”, came to be. Can there be an objective truth or is truth always subjective? Why do we simultaneously covet or pursue the truth and at times admire the genius of a lie? What parts do self-deception and moral ambiguity play in our attempts to tell truth from lie? This course is not a philosophy seminar but explores these questions in a variety of discourses and media. Topics such as why superheroes lie, the possibility of truth in photography and paintings, and the development of lying in children will be discussed.

Enrollment Information:
Time: W 3-3:50pm
Place: TBA
Course Code: 87635

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Kai Evers

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Waters in Conflict

Andrew Hallak
Biography:
Hello all! As a water warrior, I am so excited to introduce you to the wonderful world of water! Screen Shot 2016-02-06 at 5.08.51 PMMy name is Andrew Hallak and I became fascinated with the prospects of using water as a tool for peacebuilding in conflict regions since my freshman year. I’m currently a fourth year undergraduate student majoring in International Studies and minoring in Earth System Sciences and Urban Planning. During my time at UC Irvine, I had the opportunity to travel to the Middle East and conducted independent research on current water crises in the Gaza Strip. I also traveled to Costa Rica to assess public trust in municipal water authorities.  At any given moment, you can probably catch me reading the most recent article from the Water Journal while hanging around Aldrich Park in my hammock! If you ever see me, feel free to stop by and discuss anything from my favorite crocheting stich to politics in the Middle East!

Course Description:
This course seeks to challenge you in critically questioning water resource management in a multidisciplinary fashion. We will review the impact water has on society and the main status of water resource management in a global dimension. Through active engagement, we will explore major issues facing freshwater resources and alarming trends that are occurring globally and locally. We will further delve into the understandings of the interactions between freshwater resource management with one or a combination of the following factors: external political conflicts, environmental concerns, neocolonialism, economic capacity and socio-cultural trends. This course will look at various case studies to further dismantle the understanding of water management in different contexts around the world. Together we will gain the tools to view freshwater through the perspective of various stakeholders and have the ability to apply themes learned to any water resource management conflict.

Enrollment Information:
Time: W 3-3:50pm
Place: SSL 171
Course Code: 87636

Faculty Mentor: David Feldman

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Malls & Sprawls

Screen Shot 2016-02-06 at 5.08.21 PMHuitzijared Contreras
Biography: Huitzijared Contreras is a 3rd year History and International Studies double major. Raised in the San Fernando Valley, she is fascinated by Southern California’s built environment, suburban culture, and social movements throughout the 1950s and into recent history. She is an active leader in the on campus Catholic ministry, co-chair of the first undocumented student run group, Undocumented Anteaters, and a mentor in the Humanities Mentor Program. Although she can often be found watching TV shows from the early 2000s (Gilmore Girls and One Tree Hill), her favorite activities include film photography, hiking, and making green juices.  Under the guidance of her advisor, Dr. Anita Casavantes-Bradford, Huitzijared is currently exploring the consumer culture in the San Fernando Valley and the implications it has had on social structure and change.

Course Description:

On the sunny outskirts of Los Angeles is the San Fernando Valley, a region short on exciting pastimes, but full of malls. ‘The Valley’ provides a vivid site for exploring the emergence of a new American mass consumer culture following the explosive growth of the suburbs after WWII.  Reflecting prevalent cold war values and attitudes, malls exemplified the American consumer ethos and facilitated the placement of people in idealized spaces. But malls weren’t the first public spaces to entertain large groups of people with cash to spend. Swap meets were the budget friendly alternative that predated and co-existed with malls in the post war period. So why is it that the valley girls of west were only made famous by their presence in malls? Using popularized mass media as a guide, “Malls and Sprawls” will analyze the various factors that led to the creation of the new postwar consumer culture alongside Southern California’s suburbs, tracing the trajectory that has made the San Fernando Valley into an iconic American place and the empire of malls in films, songs, and TV shows.

 

Enrollment Information:
Time: M 11-11:50
Place: SSL 152
Course Code: 87640

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Casavantes Bradford

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Turkey/Minorities

Darine Atassi 
Biography: 

My name is Darine and I am a fourth year international studies and political science major,Screen Shot 2016-02-06 at 5.09.16 PM with an emphasis on comparative politics and conflict resolution in the Middle East. As a travel bug, I have ventured to many corners of the world but most often to the Middle East. As a lover of culture, history, politics, and art, my horizon was expanded when I chose to study abroad last year in Istanbul. Studying abroad there and traveling there frequently prompted me to explore the country more, leading me to travel all over the country and its neighboring states. When I’m not traveling, I am hanging out with my cat, hiking on the beach, or planning out my next travel adventures!

Course Description:

In this course we will examine and learn in depth the history, culture, and identity of the Turkish Republic, by dividing the geographic location into ten distinct parts and delving into the characteristics that form the personality of these areas. This includes looking at the history of these regions, the traditions of the different people, the conflicts that have occurred (and in some cases, continue to occur), the relationship between the society and government, and ideologies that continue to challenge and propel both the narratives of the Turkish people and the international community. While we do this, we will attempt to construct the identity of the Turkish Republic as a whole, while deconstructing the identity of what makes one a “Turk”, and how these identities are swiftly being altered in the 21st century. This course is meant to challenge the ideas that are supposedly contradictory such as “East” and “West”, “citizen” and “alien”, “secular” and “religious”, “individual” and “community” all from the perspective of the Republic of Turkey.

Enrollment Information:
Time: TBA
Place: TBA
Course Code: 87637

Faculty Mentor: Dr. Brunstetter
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