CRIME ALERT: RESIDENTIAL BURGLARY

DATE: November 25, 2014
INCIDENT / LOCATION: Residential Burglary in Vista Del Campo

DATE / TIME OCCURRED: November 22, 2014 between 8:45 pm – 10:30 pm
DETAILS:

On Saturday, November 22, 2014, at approximately 11:07 pm, the UCI Police Department received a report of a residential burglary in the Vista Del Campo housing community that occurred between 8:45 pm and 10:30 pm. An unknown suspect(s) entered the victim’s residence through an unlocked ground floor window. The suspect(s) stole miscellaneous jewelry, electronics and a purse. There were no other similar signs of burglary in the area.

It can be assumed that crimes of a similar nature could continue to occur since the suspect has not been identified. Members and guests of the UCI community should take precautions. Keep doors and windows locked. Immediately report inoperable locks and latches to the appropriate maintenance personnel in your housing community. Never leave purses, wallets, electronics or other valuables in plain sight. Immediately report all suspicious persons, vehicles and activities to the UCI Police Department at (949) 824-5223.

In emergency situations or during crimes in progress, dial 9-1-1 or use an emergency phone available on campus. Emergency phone locations are marked on the campus map available at http://communications.uci.edu//documents/pdf/UCI_14_map_campus.pdf.

If you have information that could be helpful in this investigation, please contact UCI Police Department at (949) 824-5223.

WHAT IS THIS CRIME ALERT? Crime Alerts are released by the UCI Police Department when certain crimes are reported on or near campus property, in compliance with federal law. These Crime Alerts provide information about campus safety situations and allow campus community members to take precautions for personal safety.

Cultural Holidays!

Contributed by: Jojo Siu, Verano Place Housing Assistant 

Verano is bursting with a diverse population of people from all cultures. As you may have noticed, the residents that live here come from all over the world—from India, to China, Korea to Italy, Africa to Philippines, and many more.

Here are some interesting facts about some of the upcoming international holidays in November-December. Let’s continue to be aware of the cultural diversity and the events that our residents celebrate.

 

Month of November:

  1. National Native American Heritage Month! With the amount of Indian reservations present in California and the west coast, don’t forget to acknowledge the Native Americans that are present among us.
  1. November 3:
    1. Ashura: a holiday recognized by Muslims to mark the martyrdom of Hussain. It also commemorates that day Noah left the ark and Moses was saved from the Egyptians by God.
  2. November 11:
    1. Veterans Day, an annual U.S. federal holiday honoring military veterans. Also known as Armistice Day or Remembrance Day, it commemorates the ending of the first World War in 1918.
  3. November 12:
    1. Birth of Baha’u’llah: Celebration of the birthday of the founder of the Baha’i religion.
  4. November 20:
    1. Transgender Day of Remembrance, established in 1998 to memorialize those who have been killed as a result of transphobia and raise awareness of the continued violence endured by the transgender community.
  5. November 23:
    1. Feast of Christ the King, the last holy Sunday in the western liturgical calendar. Observed by the Roman Catholic Church, as well as many Anglicans, Lutherans, and other mainline Protestants.

 

Month of December:

  1. December 1- World AIDS Day, in commemoration of those who have died of AIDS, and to acknowledge the need for a continued commitment to all those affected by the HIV/AIDS epidemic.
  2. December 8-Bodhi Day, a Buddhist holiday to commemorate Gautama’s enlightenment under the Bodhi tree at Bodhgaya, India.
  3. December 10 International Human Rights Day, established by the United Nations in 1948 to commemorate the anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
  4. December 12is Feast Day at Our Lady of Guadalupe, that commemorates the appearance of the Virgin Mary near Mexico City in 1531.
  5. December 16-24is Las Posadas, a nine-day celebration in Mexico commemorating the trials Mary and Joseph endured during their journey to Bethlehem.
  6. December 16 (sunset) – December 24 (sunset)is Hanukkah (Chanukah). Also known as the Festival of Lights, it is an eight-day Jewish holiday recognizing the rededication of the Holy Temple in Jerusalem. It is observed by lighting candles on a Menorah—one for each day of the festival.
  7. December 25—Christmas, the day Christians associate with Jesus’ birth.
  8. December 26 – January 1-Kwanzaa, an African-American holiday started by Maulana Karenga in 1966 to celebrate universal African-American heritage. It is observed by lighting candles to represent each of the holiday’s seven principles, libations, feasting, and gift giving.

Maintenance Monday: Holiday Decorating and Tree Safety

During the holidays, your home is more susceptible to fire than at any other time of the year. For your safety and that of your loved ones, we encourage you to follow the tips listed below when preparing for the holidays.

 DECORATING AND SAFETY TIPS

  • Trees or other decorative materials should not be located in any area where they may block corridors, exit passageways, fire exits, doorways, or ramps.
  • All decorations should be flame retardant. Look for the California State Fire Marshal’s Seal of Approval on packages of decorative materials.
  • If you plan to place any decorations outside on your door or patio, use command type removable strips to hang the decoration.  Ensure any lights are rated for outdoor use.
  • Decorating is one way many residents get in the holiday spirit. If you plan use holiday lights, plan to have them removed by January 2, when the academic quarter starts up again.
  • Extension cords can create a fire and trip hazard. If you use extension cords locate one, long enough that you do not need to connect or daisy chain cords together. Additionally, extension cords, if used, should be equipped with LCD’ (Leakage Current Detection and Interruption) for circuit protection. This type of protection is available in Fire Shield brand extension cords and power strips available at most home improvement stores such as Home Depot.
  • Due to fire safety hazards candles or other open flame devices are not permitted inside any on-campus residential buildings.

 HOLIDAY TREES

Holiday trees can be one of the most hazardous items you bring into your home or office. A dry tree can be totally engulfed in fire within three seconds, generating such intense heat that it can ignite the furnishings and wall and window coverings in an entire room in less than one minute. To view a video clip from the U.S. Fire Administration demonstrating how fast a tree can become fully engulfed in flames go to: http://www.usfa.fema.gov/citizens/home_fire_prev/holiday-seasonal/holiday.shtm.

According to the U.S. Fire Administration, holiday trees account for 400 fires, resulting in 10 deaths, 80 injuries and more than $15 million in property damage.

 SAFETY AND YOUR HOLIDAY TREE

A holiday tree purchased from a lot or cut on a tree farm can remain relatively fire-resistant if you follow these simple steps:

  Make A Fresh Cut

  • Fresh cut trees should be treated with flame retardant before being brought to campus. This is a common service that is provided by most tree vendors licensed by the California State Fire Marshal. Many large tree vendors that offer services such as flocking also offer this flame retardant. Check with your vendor before you purchase your tree and be sure to request this additional treatment.
  • Make a fresh cut at the base on a diagonal in order to open up pores clogged by sap. Cut off 2-3 inches. The fresh-cut surface should be creamy white. Otherwise, the tree will not be able to drink water.
  • After the cut is made, put the tree in water immediately to increase absorption. Hot tap water should be used for the first filling.

 Initial Watering

  • Choose a sturdy stand that holds at least one gallon of water.
  • Rinse the tree stand with a mixture of one capful of bleach and one cup of water before inserting the tree. This rinsing reduces the growth of microorganisms that can block the tree’s ability to absorb water.
  • If the tree is not going into the house soon after purchase, it should be stored in a bucket of water in a cool place away from wind and sun.

 Water Daily

  • An average tree may consume between a quart and a gallon of water per day.
  • If the water level drops below the cut end of the trunk, a seal will form and the tree will absorb no more water. So don’t forget to add water every day!

 Mini-Lights Produce Less Heat

  • Holiday tree fires started by short circuit or ground fault account for $4.9 million in damage in the United States every year.
  • Always check lights for frayed or cracked wiring and broken sockets before placing on a tree. Do not attempt to repair a worn light set. Throw it away and buy a new set.
  • Avoid overloading circuits.
  • Turn off tree lights when leaving the house or before going to bed.
  • Miniature lights produce less heat and reduce the drying effect.
  • NEVER use candles to light your tree!

 Keep Away From Heat Sources

  • Place the tree away from heat sources such as heating vents, fireplaces, wood stoves, radiators, television sets or sunny windows. Keep rearranged furniture away from heat sources also.
  • Be careful not to block a door with the tree or with rearranged furniture.

 Remove The Tree Promptly

  • After the Holidays, remove the tree from the house before it dries.
  • Please place your tree at the nearest dumpster location.

More information can be found at http://www.ehs.uci.edu/gensafe/Home_HolidaySafety.pdf

December 7, Joyful Jingles Holiday Concert

JoyfulJingles

Capture the spirit of the season at the City of Irvine’s Joyful Jingles holiday concert on Sunday, December 7, from 3-5 p.m. at Irvine Barclay Theatre. A community tradition, the concert features a selection of uplifting seasonal and holiday music performed by local choral groups. $0 $0 Tickets will be available at the door starting at 2 p.m. with seating commencing at 2:45 p.m. Parking is $10 and is available at the UCI Student Center parking structure located at the corner of Campus and West Peltason/Bridge Road.$0 $0 Guests are welcome to bring a new, unwrapped toy for children up to 12 years of age as part of the City’s toy drive to benefit the families of Irvine’s adopted Marine Battalion. For more information, call 949-724-6606.

UPDATE: Laundry Room Renovation Project

Due to a few unknown structural and other construction related surprises the laundry room renovation project schedule has been revised. The following laundry rooms have been inspected for similar challenges, limiting the time extension or delay to the overall schedule.

The new schedule also spaces out laundry room closures to accommodate the structural repair items, minimizing the impacts anticipated through this project.

Updated Renovation Schedule:

Monday 10/13/2014 to Friday 11/21/2014: LR 11
Monday 10/13/2014 to Friday 11/28/2014: LR 17
Tuesday 11/25/2014 to Friday 12/26/2014: LR 19 (this laundry room will be heat treated for termite treatment trials on 11/24/2014)
Tuesday 12/2/2014 to Friday 1/2/2015: LR 13
Tuesday 12/30/2014 to Friday 1/30/2015: LR 18
Tuesday 1/6/2015 to Friday 2/6/2014: LR14
Tuesday 2/3/2015 to Friday 3/6/2014: LR 12
Tuesday 2/10/2014 to Friday 3/13/2015: LR 16
Tuesday 3/10/2015 to Friday 3/27/2015: LR 15

 
Please contact me with any questions you may have regarding this project or any other operational concerns.

Thank you,
Jason A. Espinoza
Associate Director of Operations
Verano Place Housing

(949) 824-6739 (office)
(949) 824-2617 (fax)

Tip Tuesday: How to Maintain Levels of Tolerable Stress

Contributed by: Taisha Lewis, Verano Housing Assistant 

Websters Dictionary defines stress as, “strain felt by somebody; mental, emotional, or physical strain caused”. A mild amount of stress is normal for most people and can even be healthy as it motivates human beings to solve problems and strive for better life conditions. However, high and prolonged levels of stress can be detrimental and the effects can be devastating.

As graduate students and graduate student families stress can be especialy elevated. Balancing extensive studies, employment, financial issues, family life, and other obligations can be difficult and can lead to extreme levels of stress. This stress can manifest in many ways. One impact of stress is that it dramatically increases the likelihood of troubled relationships. Stress impacts our ability to communicate efficiently and productively resolve individual and interpersonal conflict.

Maintaining healthy levels of tolerable stress is a lifelong skill that is continually evolving and changes with circumstances. Time-management and life-style changes are two of many tools that can be used to manage stress. However managing stress in a relationship, and addressing existing damage that stress has caused, can prove to be quite challenging from some. In these instances outside help can prove most beneficial. Whether for individuals, families, or couples the following resources provide free counseling services:

UCI Counseling Center
949-824-6457
www.counseling.uci.edu

South Orange County Family Resource Center
949-364-0500
SOCFRC.org

Families Forward
949-552-2727
www.families-forward.org

Maintenance Monday: Please Keep Verano Place Clean

We take pride in our Verano Place community and how it looks is important to us. We ask that you assist us with keeping our community clean by:

  •  Placing all garbage in trash cans and help cleaning up after activities. Throw your non-biodegradable items and food in the trash instead of out of the car window. on the curb, or in the lawn. Did you know that 33 percent of all littered garbage is fast food waste?
  • Avoid using plastic bags. They have a habit of flying everywhere and are harmful to animals if eaten or tangled in the bags. Buy new multi-purpose bags from your local supermarket or other stores. These new bags are very strong and can be carried in another bag by folding it up.
  • Another way you can help is by utilizing recycling. When you are done, recycle it!
  • To help prevent water pollution, only flush or pour things down the sink that will not damage the water supply; avoid putting paint, old medications, glue and other potentially damaging items down the sink or toilet. Learn what the appropriate ways of disposing of these things are.

Keeping your neighborhood clean can bring the community closer and really shows that you care about where you live.