Holiday Notices, Decorations in Common Areas

Good Morning,

Many residents have begun to put up holiday decorations; we love seeing the beautiful decorations from all different cultures and traditions. Walking around Verano Place we have noticed some decorations going up in common areas such as walkways, hallways, courtyards, and on grass, trees and bushes in the common areas.

Consistent with our general policy around use of common areas, decorations in these areas are not permitted. Common areas are for the use and enjoyment of the community at large.  These areas may not be used for resident storage, decorations, or planting and should be kept free of debris and personal items. Decorating in these areas can create fire and safety hazards, attract rodents, and interfere with planned grounds and operations work.  If you have placed decorations or other items in a common area (any space or facility other than the interior your apartment and private patio/balcony) please relocate them to your residence.

Below is information on using a shuttle service for winter break travel and holiday decorating and safety tips.

Please contact the Verano Place Housing Office if you have any questions.

RIDE THE HOLIDAY SHUTTLE FOR WINTER BREAK

UCI Transportation is happy to offer complimentary shuttle service to support your travel plans during the winter break. Service will be provided between the main campus and John Wayne Airport, and between the main campus and the Irvine Transportation Center (Metrolink/Amtrak Station).

The shuttle will depart UCI at set times on Thursday, December 8, and Friday, December 9. Return service will be available at set times on Sunday, January 8, and Monday, January 9. To review schedules and make reservations, see:www.parking.uci.edu/services/campus/holidayshuttle.cfm.

 

For questions regarding the Holiday Shuttle, please email rideshare@uci.edu. We look forward to easing your travel stress during the upcoming campus break.

 

HOLIDAY DECORATING SAFETY TIPS

Immediately following Thanksgiving, people start decorating their homes for the holidays. During the holidays, your home is more susceptible to fire than at any other time of the year. For your safety and that of your loved ones, we encourage you to follow the tips listed below when preparing for the holidays.

 

 DECORATING AND SAFETY TIPS

  • Trees or other decorative materials should not be located in any area where they may block corridors, exit passageways, fire exits, doorways, or ramps.
  • All decorations should be flame retardant. Look for the California State Fire Marshal’s Seal of Approval on packages of decorative materials.
  • If you plan to place any decorations outside on your door or patio, use Command-type removable strips to hang the decoration.  Ensure any lights are rated for outdoor use.
  • Decorating is one way many residents get in the holiday spirit. If you plan use holiday lights, plan to have them removed by January 2, when the academic quarter starts up again.
  • Extension cords can create a fire and trip hazard. If you use extension cords locate one, long enough that you do not need to connect or daisy chain cords together. Additionally, extension cords, if used, should be equipped with LCD’ (Leakage Current Detection and Interruption) for circuit protection. This type of protection is available in Fire Shield brand extension cords and power strips available at most home improvement stores such as Home Depot.
  • Due to fire safety hazards candles or other open flame devices are not permitted inside any on-campus residential buildings.

 

HOLIDAY TREE SAFETY

Holiday trees can be one of the most hazardous items you bring into your home or office. A dry tree can be totally engulfed in fire within three seconds, generating such intense heat that it can ignite the furnishings and wall and window coverings in an entire room in less than one minute. Click here to view a video that illustrates what happens when fire touches a properly maintained, well-watered tree vs. a dry tree According to the U.S. Fire Administration, holiday trees account for 400 fires, resulting in 10 deaths, 80 injuries and more than $15 million in property damage.

 

A holiday tree purchased from a lot or cut on a tree farm can remain relatively fire-resistant if you follow these simple steps:

 

  Make a Fresh Cut

  • Fresh cut trees should be treated with flame retardant before being brought to campus. This is a common service that is provided by most tree vendors licensed by the California State Fire Marshal. Many large tree vendors that offer services such as flocking also offer this flame retardant. Check with your vendor before you purchase your tree and be sure to request this additional treatment.
  • Make a fresh cut at the base on a diagonal in order to open up pores clogged by sap. Cut off 2-3 inches. The fresh-cut surface should be creamy white. Otherwise, the tree will not be able to drink water.
  • After the cut is made, put the tree in water immediately to increase absorption. Hot tap water should be used for the first filling.

 Initial Watering

  • Choose a sturdy stand that holds at least one gallon of water.
  • Rinse the tree stand with a mixture of one capful of bleach and one cup of water before inserting the tree. This rinsing reduces the growth of microorganisms that can block the tree’s ability to absorb water.
  • If the tree is not going into the house soon after purchase, it should be stored in a bucket of water in a cool place away from wind and sun.

 Water Daily

  • An average tree may consume between a quart and a gallon of water per day.
  • If the water level drops below the cut end of the trunk, a seal will form and the tree will absorb no more water. So don’t forget to add water every day!

 Mini-Lights Produce Less Heat

  • Holiday tree fires started by short circuit or ground fault account for $4.9 million in damage in the United States every year.
  • Always check lights for frayed or cracked wiring and broken sockets before placing on a tree. Do not attempt to repair a worn light set. Throw it away and buy a new set.
  • Avoid overloading circuits.
  • Turn off tree lights when leaving the house or before going to bed.
  • Miniature lights produce less heat and reduce the drying effect.
  • NEVER use candles to light your tree!

 Keep Away From Heat Sources

  • Place the tree away from heat sources such as heating vents, fireplaces, wood stoves, radiators, television sets or sunny windows. Keep rearranged furniture away from heat sources also.
  • Be careful not to block a door with the tree or with rearranged furniture.

 Remove the Tree Promptly

  • After the Holidays, remove the tree from the house before it dries.
  • Please place your tree at the nearest dumpster location.

 

More information can be found at http://www.ehs.uci.edu/gensafe/Home_HolidaySafety.pdf

Important Holiday Information

The Verano Housing Office will be closed in observance of the Thanksgiving Holiday from November 24-27, 2016. The Office will re-open on Monday, November 28th at 8:00am

 

If you have administrative or maintenance issues that cannot wait until November 28, 2016, contact the office immediately so we can work to address your concerns before the holiday weekend.

 

For emergency assistance during the holiday break, please call the Housing Assistant at 949-294-1812. Wednesday evening until 11 pmand from 8 am Friday through the weekend. please note: From 11:00pm Wednesday, November 23rd through 8:00am Friday, November 25th the UCI Police Department will be providing coverage for the community.   During this time, please call the UCI Police Department for EMERGENCIES only, at 949.824.5223.

 

TIPS FOR PREVENTING DRAIN CLOGS

Every year around Thanksgiving we receive a spike in calls about clogged drains. These are the usual types of food and debris found clogging the pipes and tangled on the garbage disposal blades: fragments of turkey or turkey bones, potato peels, celery fibers, and excessive globs of gravy, blue cheese and bacon.

 

In preparation for the holidays, we thought we should share some tips how to prevent drain clogs when preparing and cleaning up after meals.

DO’S:

  • DO keep your garbage disposal clean. Pour a little dish soap inside and let the garbage disposal run for a minute or so with some cold water after washing dishes.
  • DO feed small food scraps into the garbage disposal a little at a time with the cold water running; this will help the food scraps flow down freely through the drain pipes and plumbing.
  • DO grind food waste w/ a strong flow of cold water. Why cold water? It will cause any grease or oils that may get into the unit to solidify, so that they can be chopped up before reaching the trap.

DON’TS

  • DON’T put turkey or turkey bones down your drain or garbage disposal; they can clog the drain and damage the disposal.
  • DON’T put potato peels down the drain or garbage disposal. The starches in the potatoes will turn into a thick paste and may cause blades to stick and/or clog the drain.
  • DON’T put extremely fibrous material like corn husks, celery stalks, onion skins, and artichokes in the garbage disposal.  Fibers from these can tangle and jam the garbage disposal motor and block drains.
  • DON’T put expandable foods into your garbage disposal. Foods like pasta and rice expand when you add water in a pot; they do the same thing once inside your pipes or garbage disposal and are the cause of many jams and clogs.
  • DON’T put bacon products, gravy, or other greasy foods in your drain (or grind in a garbage disposal). The grease will clog the drain.
  • DON’T turn off the motor or water until grinding is completed. When grinding is complete, turn off the garbage disposal first. Let water continue to run for at least 15 seconds, flushing out any remaining particles. Then turn off water.

 

HOLIDAY DECORATING AND SAFETY TIPS

Immediately following Thanksgiving, people start decorating their homes for the holidays. During the holidays, your home is more susceptible to fire than at any other time of the year. For your safety and that of your loved ones, we encourage you to follow the tips listed below when preparing for the holidays.

 

 DECORATING AND SAFETY TIPS

  • Trees or other decorative materials should not be located in any area where they may block corridors, exit passageways, fire exits, doorways, or ramps.
  • All decorations should be flame retardant. Look for the California State Fire Marshal’s Seal of Approval on packages of decorative materials.
  • If you plan to place any decorations outside on your door or patio, use Command-type removable strips to hang the decoration.  Ensure any lights are rated for outdoor use.
  • Decorating is one way many residents get in the holiday spirit. If you plan use holiday lights, plan to have them removed by January 2, when the academic quarter starts up again.
  • Extension cords can create a fire and trip hazard. If you use extension cords locate one, long enough that you do not need to connect or daisy chain cords together. Additionally, extension cords, if used, should be equipped with LCD’ (Leakage Current Detection and Interruption) for circuit protection. This type of protection is available in Fire Shield brand extension cords and power strips available at most home improvement stores such as Home Depot.
  • Due to fire safety hazards candles or other open flame devices are not permitted inside any on-campus residential buildings.

 

HOLIDAY TREE SAFETY

Holiday trees can be one of the most hazardous items you bring into your home or office. A dry tree can be totally engulfed in fire within three seconds, generating such intense heat that it can ignite the furnishings and wall and window coverings in an entire room in less than one minute. Click here to view a video that illustrates what happens when fire touches a properly maintained, well-watered tree vs. a dry tree According to the U.S. Fire Administration, holiday trees account for 400 fires, resulting in 10 deaths, 80 injuries and more than $15 million in property damage.

 

A holiday tree purchased from a lot or cut on a tree farm can remain relatively fire-resistant if you follow these simple steps:

 

  Make a Fresh Cut

  • Fresh cut trees should be treated with flame retardant before being brought to campus. This is a common service that is provided by most tree vendors licensed by the California State Fire Marshal. Many large tree vendors that offer services such as flocking also offer this flame retardant. Check with your vendor before you purchase your tree and be sure to request this additional treatment.
  • Make a fresh cut at the base on a diagonal in order to open up pores clogged by sap. Cut off 2-3 inches. The fresh-cut surface should be creamy white. Otherwise, the tree will not be able to drink water.
  • After the cut is made, put the tree in water immediately to increase absorption. Hot tap water should be used for the first filling.

 Initial Watering

  • Choose a sturdy stand that holds at least one gallon of water.
  • Rinse the tree stand with a mixture of one capful of bleach and one cup of water before inserting the tree. This rinsing reduces the growth of microorganisms that can block the tree’s ability to absorb water.
  • If the tree is not going into the house soon after purchase, it should be stored in a bucket of water in a cool place away from wind and sun.

 Water Daily

  • An average tree may consume between a quart and a gallon of water per day.
  • If the water level drops below the cut end of the trunk, a seal will form and the tree will absorb no more water. So don’t forget to add water every day!

 Mini-Lights Produce Less Heat

  • Holiday tree fires started by short circuit or ground fault account for $4.9 million in damage in the United States every year.
  • Always check lights for frayed or cracked wiring and broken sockets before placing on a tree. Do not attempt to repair a worn light set. Throw it away and buy a new set.
  • Avoid overloading circuits.
  • Turn off tree lights when leaving the house or before going to bed.
  • Miniature lights produce less heat and reduce the drying effect.
  • NEVER use candles to light your tree!

 Keep Away From Heat Sources

  • Place the tree away from heat sources such as heating vents, fireplaces, wood stoves, radiators, television sets or sunny windows. Keep rearranged furniture away from heat sources also.
  • Be careful not to block a door with the tree or with rearranged furniture.

 Remove the Tree Promptly

  • After the Holidays, remove the tree from the house before it dries.
  • Please place your tree at the nearest dumpster location.

 

More information can be found at http://www.ehs.uci.edu/gensafe/Home_HolidaySafety.pdf

 

VRC Special Election Voting is Underway!

Voting for the Special Election to elect 2 of your 2016-2017 VRC representatives has begun and will continue until 5:00pm on Wednesday, November 23. Please make sure to vote and let your voice be heard for which candidates you would like to represent you moving forward!

 

Voting in the election is open to all Verano Place residents over the age of 18. All residents who have provided email addresses to the Verano Place Housing Office have been added to the Ballot Bin. You should have received an email from Ballot Bin with your election code.

 

If you did not receive an email from Ballot Bin with your election code first check your junk email to see if your email server accidentally classified it as spam. If it is not in the junk email then you can email Jennifer Nelson Martinez at jnmartin@uci.edu. We will research the situation and get back to you within 1 business day.

 

If you have any questions, you may direct them to the Election Commissioner, Conner Strobel, at cstrobel@uci.edu. You may also contact Jennifer Martinez at jnmartin@uci.edu.

Upcoming VRC Community Meeting

Hello Verano Community!

 

Please join us Thursday, November 17th from 6:00pm-7:00pm in the Verano Commons for our monthly VRC Community Meeting.

 

Come with you concerns, questions, comments and suggestions to share with your VRC representatives. Let us know what you want to see from your VRC this year and ways we can work together to improve your living experience in Verano Place.

 

The Verano Residents’ Council (VRC) is elected to advocate for your needs, and to create programming and events that benefit the entire Verano community. We are working hard to provide opportunities for all community members to get their voices heard and connect with the greater community!

 

Additionally, the VRC has a Facebook group where you can get the most up to date information on events, meetings and issues. Please join at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ucivrc/

 

Best,

Your friendly, neighborhood VRC representatives

VRC Special Election

A message from your election commissioner:

*****************************************************************

Hi Verano Residents,

Do you have ideas on how to improve the community for everyone? Want more information on how to make that possible?

 Announcing the 2016-2017 Verano Residents’ Council Election! 

We will be holding two information sessions next week for all interested parties. You

will have an opportunity to meet the Election Commissioner, learn about the election

process, and ask any questions you may have regarding running for the VRC. You are eligible to run for a Council seat if you have been a Verano Place resident since at least April 2, 2016.

Attendance at one of these information sessions is a requirement to run in the election, and ensures that the election can proceed in a fair and unbiased manner.

Information Session I: Wednesday November 2 at 6:00pm in the Verano Commons.

Information Session II: Thursday, November 3at 6:00pm in the Verano Commons.

If you are interested in running for a seat, but you cannot make either of these two information sessions, please email the Election Commissioner (contact info below) by Friday of this week, and we can discuss the possibility of making alternative arrangements.

Elections will be held via electronic voting from November 17 – November 24.

If you have any questions, feel free to contact me, this year’s Election Commissioner at:cstrobel@uci.edu

Thanks,
Connor Strobel

 

Trick-or-Treat in Verano!

Will you have a Trick or Treat Friendly Home on Halloween? If you are planning on passing out candy or treats, please register for our annual Trick or Treat Map.

This map will be posted to the BLOG on Halloween so fellow residents can know where to go for Halloween fun!

 

To register please go to: https://goo.gl/forms/CWRplJy0lFWh1sbq2

 

For more information please contact: Betsy Franklin at enfrankl@uci.edu.

October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

The Initiative to End Family Violence has a robust line-up of speakers to kick off the academic year, please check out the event list below and RSVP to reserve your spot! http://endfamilyviolence.uci.edu/

Dancing the Carceral Creep:
The Feminist Anti-Domestic Violence Movement and the Paradoxical Pursuit of Criminalization

Mimi Kim, Ph.D.
Founder of Creative Interventions; Founding Member of INCITE!; and Assistant Professor, School of Social Work, California State University, Long Beach

Date: Tuesday, October 4
Time: 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.
Location: UC Irvine, Education Building,
Room 1131 (directions/parking)

 

The Neurobiology of Trauma

Mandy K. Mount, Ph.D.
Director, UCI Campus Assault
Resources & Education (CARE)

Date: Thursday, October 13
Time:
12:00 –  1:30 p.m.
Location: UC Irvine, Education Building,
Room 1131 (directions/parking)
A light lunch will be available at 11:30 a.m.