Classes

EDUC 251 : EDUCATION POLICIES AND POLITICS

Spring term

Syllabus Spring 2019

This course is designed to review the academic literature on key policy issues surrounding the pre-K through grade 12 educational system in the United States. There is much more of an emphasis on policy than politics. By structuring the class with student presentations of most of the material, I also aspire to promote student skills in synthesizing and presenting key articles in the research literature. In addition to discussing the articles in the syllabus, we will spend time each week discussing the effectiveness of the presentations themselves. Moreover, all students are required to submit discussion questions/issues before each class, which is intended to develop critical thinking. Finally, by requiring a paper that is written in the style of a registered report, I hope to promote that skill as well.

EDUC 264 : ECONOMIC FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION AND SOCIAL POLICY

Winter terms

Econ Foundation Syllabus 2019

The purpose of this course is to provide students with a grounding in how economists think about social and educational policy issues. We will cover economic models of household decision-making and stress how economists account for the costs and benefits of public (and private) programs and decisions. It is hoped that by the end of the course students will understand the theoretical frameworks economists bring to their analyses of public policy issues. Students need not be convinced that these frameworks are the only ones that could be applied to program analysis. But they should understand them sufficiently to be able to analyze a social or educational policy issue in the way that an economist would.

EDUC 265 APPLIED REGRESSION

Spring terms (not taught since 2017)

EDUC 265 Duncan syllabus 2017

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to research uses of regression models and the statistical analysis of longitudinal data.  Topics will include a review of the OLS regression model, logistic regressions models, causation and natural experiments, descriptive techniques for longitudinal data, event-history methods, and various other techniques for analyzing longitudinal data.