Current


Allison Dziuba is pursuing a PhD in English and working toward completion of the Graduate Feminist Emphasis at UCI. Some of her current research examines students’ extracurricular writing and performances, and affect in activist texts. She now serves as the Editorial Assistant for College Composition and Communication and Rhetoric Society Quarterly. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Brown University, where she concentrated in Gender and Sexuality Studies and in Literary Arts.

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Loretta Ramirez is earning her PhD in English with a focus on Rhetoric and a UCI Graduate Visual Studies Emphasis. Since 2007, she has been a lecturer of Composition in the Chicano & Latino Studies Department at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB). She previously taught Composition and Literature in the English Department at El Camino College (ECC) where she also coordinated the ECC Puente Project, a program that guides Latino students from the first-year college experience into the transfer process through a focus on composition skills, academic counseling, mentorship, and cultural exploration. Loretta is dedicated to the study of culture and cultural expression in its various written and visual formats; she is particularly interested in studying the rhetoric of Iberian and Iberian American religious traditions, from Catholic colonial contact to modern expressions of identities. Previously, Loretta earned her BA in Anthropology from Stanford University, her M.A. in English from Loyola Marymount, and a second MA in Art History at CSULB. She has most recently been published in Contemporaneity: Historical Presence in Visual Culture and Dandelion Journal: Postgraduate Arts Journal and Research Network for her work on Argentine Contemporary artist David Lamelas. Additionally, she has written for the Pearson Education Pedagogy and Practice series on teaching strategies within Composition courses. Loretta’s latest contribution to the field of education has been through her work as a presenter in the 2017 panel, “Teaching at the Intersections: Rhetoric and Composition Programs in Chican@ Studies” at the National Association for Chicana and Chicano Studies Conference. When Loretta is not exploring the academic world, she loves promoting culture and art in her native Los Angeles at the J. Paul Getty Center where she has regularly volunteered since 2013 in the Education Department.

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Maureen A. J. Fitzsimmons received her Bachelor of Arts in English and also her Master of Arts in English, with an emphasis on Rhetoric and Composition, from Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, California. She is currently working on a PhD in English at the University of California, Irvine, focusing on Rhetoric and Composition. She is a Fellow in the Lilly Fellows Program in the Humanities and the Arts, in addition to being a University of California at Irvine Regent’s Fellow, and has served as Vice Chair of the Jesuit Conference on Rhetoric and Composition. Her scholarly interests include composition historiographies and pedagogies, in all their manifestations, with special attention to Jesuit pedagogy. She has a chapter in Traditions of Eloquence, edited by Cinthia Gannett and John Brereton, from Fordham Press, and has published a book review on the Stephen J. Reid and Emma Annette Wilson edited Ramus, Pedagogy and the Liberal Arts in Rhetorica.


Alumni


Jasmine Lee is an assistant professor in the department of English at California State University, San Bernardino. She completed her PhD and the Critical Theory Emphasis at UCI in 2018. Jasmine’s dissertation traced the influence of capitalism through various sites of American rhetorical education in the twentieth century, exploring how the political economic order has underwritten foundational figures in our field, especially the figure of “youth.” Jasmine’s work has appeared in the Journal for the Fantastic in the Arts; the Instructor’s Manual of Understanding Rhetoric, 2nd edition, the graphic textbook by Elizabeth Losh and Jonathan Alexander; and the Los Angeles Review of Books. During her time at UCI, Jasmine served as the Editorial Assistant for Rhetoric Society Quarterly; Editorial Assistant for College Composition and Communication; and Graduate Writing Fellow in the UCI Office of the Campus Writing Coordinator. You can find additional information about Jasmine, her teaching, and her research at jasminelee.me.

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Jens Lloyd joined the faculty in the English department at Drew University in 2018. He completed his PhD at UCI, where his dissertation focused on exploring how campuses function as dynamic social and material environments for rhetorical education and college writing. During his time at UCI, he served as Campus Writing Fellow and as Editorial Assistant for College Composition and Communication and Rhetoric Society Quarterly. You can read his stuff in Literacy in Composition Studies, Present Tense: A Journal of Rhetoric in Society, and the Los Angeles Review of Books.

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Rachel Stumpf completed her PhD in Education at UCI in 2018. She is currently a Postdoctoral Associate in the Office of the Associate Provost for Graduate Affairs at Boston University. Rachel’s research is motivated by her experiences as a high school language arts teacher and a facilitator of teacher professional development. In her dissertation research, Rachel examined how students developed as writers as they transitioned from high school to college writing environments. Rachel also studies the role that classroom instruction, curriculum, and policy play in writing development.

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Libby Catchings completed her PhD in English at UCI in 2015. Using methodological frameworks that borrow from anthropology, radical critical theory, and law, her dissertation examined composition practices in prison-based literacy communities and the rhetorical economies that govern the scholarship coming out of those spaces. Other interests involve rhetorics of emotion, critical pedagogy, and theories of autobiography. Libby is a teaching assistant professor at the University of Denver.

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Since completing his PhD in English with an emphasis in Composition in June 2014, Lance Langdon has served as Visiting Assistant Professor in UCI’s Humanities Core Program and Lecturer in UCI’s Composition Program. His dissertation Feeling Engaged: College Writers as Literacy Tutors, examined the emotional contours of the university-community partnerships he initiated within Mexicanx communities in Orange County. In addition to publishing a book review, a website, and the occasional poem, Lance has published academic articles in The Faulkner Journal and Reflections: A Journal of Public Writing, Civic Rhetoric, and Service Learning. His current research addresses the role of emotions in the writing process. This topic and others concerning emotions are explored in the Summer 2016 special issue of Composition Forum, which Lance directed as Guest Editor.

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Abraham Romney is an assistant professor at Michigan Tech, where he also serves as the director of the Multiliteracies Center. He received his PhD in Comparative Literature at UC Irvine. His dissertation, Latin American Rhetoric: From Civilization to Modernity, examined historical and indigenous rhetorics, focusing on the role that rhetorical manuals and concepts from the classical rhetorical tradition played in shaping Latin American language policy and higher education and perceptions of indigenous populations. Visit his Academia.edu profile.



Banner photo credit: Maestrapeace Mural, Lapidge Street Facade, The San Francisco Women’s Building. Muralists: Juana Alicia, Miranda Bergman, Edythe Boone, Susan Cervantes, Meera Desal, Yvonne Littleton, Irene Perez, 1993–1994 (photo courtesy of Meastrapeaceartworks.com)